Kids & Obesity: Two Things Don’t Belong Together

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Truth be told: I was a fat kid. I was called names and made fun of in elementary school. It’s a painful childhood memory.

I don’t remember my parents or doctor talking to me about my weight (they may have). I do remember earning “clean plate club” honors a lot. As I was starting high school, I’d had it with shopping in the Sears section for heavy kids. I was missing out and unhappy about my weight. I didn’t lose it in the best way (I remember Tab and those old Weight Watchers chocolate squares), but did drop 25 pounds before 9th grade.

Yes, those were different times, and salt-laden casseroles and sugary Jell-O were staples at family gatherings and church dinners. At home, Durkee french fried onion rings and shoestring potato sticks in a can were always in the cupboard . . . to top off those casseroles.  They were ready-to-eat bad snacks I grabbed for instant “food.”

As I got older, I learned more about unhealthy habits. Given my experience, I cringed when I read the latest stats from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: more than one third of U.S. children and teens are overweight or obese, and obesity has doubled in children and quadrupled in adolescents over the last 30 years!

Sadly, a New England Journal of Medicine article says the road to obesity starts before age 5.

Childhood obesity is more upsetting because the extra pounds often start kids on the path to health problems that were once only adult issues, like diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol. And as I know, it can also affect self-esteem.

How can we help our kids?

via KidsHealth.org

via KidsHealth.org

It may come as no surprise that new guidelines published last Monday, June 29, by the American Academy of Pediatrics say we need to focus on prevention.

This starts by understanding when a child is considered obese—when a child is well above the normal weight for his or her age and height, as measured by body mass index (BMI). The standards are:

  • Overweight = BMI-for-age between 85th and 94th percentiles
  • Obese = BMI-for-age 95th percentile or above

(You can use this tool from Kid’s Health to check your children.)

Make better food choices and exercise

vegetablesOne of the best strategies to prevent childhood obesity is to lead by example, improving diet and exercise habits of your whole family.

Most of us know to buy fewer sweetened beverages (sodas, juice and sports drinks) and not stock junk food in the house (or buy it in bulk!). We’ve also heard about First Lady Michelle Obama’s Let’s Move initiative stressing physical activity and the recommended 60 minutes of active play time day.

So how do we put good habits into practice? A few practical tips:

  • Don’t ban junk food outright. Instead, limit the number of treats kids are allowed to eat. That way, kids aren’t as tempted to want what they can’t have or overeat when it’s offered by someone else.
  • Keep fresh fruit in reach to grab as a quick snack. Put higher-calorie foods in the back of the frig or pantry. Get good frozen and canned fruits and vegetables (no and no sugar or salt) when fresh isn’t available.
  • via LetsMove.org

    via LetsMove.org

    Make an effort to limit technology time for kids to no more than 2 hours a day, including computers, videos, games, watching TV. Turn off the TV during family meals to prevent distracted eating (and more) – Have you seen Dixie’s Dark for Dinner ads?

  • Plan activities that give everyone exercise, like walking, biking and swimming. Turn a walk after dinner into a family affair.
  • Make sure your kids get enough sleep, since studies suggest there’s a link between obesity and insufficient sleep.

For more: check out these 10 healthy eating tips and take advantage of the thousands of healthy MyPlate recipes on Pinterest.

Physician education

We now know doctors have to get more involved. While weight is an uncomfortable and awkward topic to tackle, physicians need to address it during children’s visits.

kids running 11578647Recent collaborative research between Caroline Shue, associate professor of communication studies at Ball State University and the IU Health Ball Memorial Hospital Family Medicine Residency Center found a hesitancy to discuss weight is compounded by a disconnect with the reason for the visit (e.g., an ear infection for a “solid” child) as well as a lack of doctors’ training and consistent clinic practices to calculate BMI and chart discussions with patients.

The research identified several good ways to fix the problems, including:  targeted training programs for doctors; and doctor’s offices documenting patients’ height, weight, and BMI more frequently and regularly.

Support nonprofits making a difference

We can all help charities working to get kids more active and prevent obesity. Here are three with programs designed to do just that, operating across the country:

American Heart Association
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Boys & Girls Clubs of America
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YMCA of the USA
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We’ve come a long way since I was a little girl, and I’m encouraged by all the attention, education and resources that exist now. Let’s step up, so other kids can skip all the bad stuff that comes from carrying too much weight. Here’s to preventing childhood obesity, and raising healthier future generations!

– Candy Culver
Marketing Consultant

Women power to Alzheimer’s

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Two out of every three of the 5.2 million Americans who have Alzheimer’s disease are women. Women are also more likely to be caregivers of those with the disease, affected by it both emotionally and financially.

The sixth leading cause of death in the United States, Alzheimer’s disease is an irreversible, progressive brain disease that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills. Every 67 seconds, a brain develops Alzheimer’s disease.

These facts—and being personally touched by Alzheimer’s when her father, Sargent Shriver, was diagnosed in 2003 (he passed away in 2011) have award-winning journalist Maria Shriver on a mission to wipe out Alzheimer’s.  An Alzheimer’s advocate for the past 10 years, she testified before Congress to help pass the National Alzheimer’s Plan to stop the disease by 2025, and also recently produced the movie, Still Alice.

Wipe out Alzheimer’s

Shriver’s Wipe Out Alzheimer’s Challenge was created in partnership with the Alzheimer’s Association and her nonprofit organization, A Woman’s Nation. The heart of this grassroots, social action effort is to end the devastating disease by educating, engaging and empowering women.  Our brains are most at risk, and she believes our brains are the ones that can turn the tide.

Saving women’s brains

To mobilize the movement, women are encouraged to take “The Pledge”  to stay educated about what it is, what it is not and make healthy lifestyle decisions about it.  We can also help raise funds to research women’s brains and challenge other organizations to make women’s brain research a priority.

All the money raised through the Wipe Out Alzheimer’s Challenge is going to the Alzheimer’s Association’s first-ever Women’s Alzheimer’s Research Fund to support cutting-edge brain research.

I’m joining the challenge.  I’ve seen Alzheimer’s personally take the mothers of two good friends and turn them into a person who, sadly, doesn’t recognize their own child. And I’m watching as a third friend manages her mother with dementia now. It’s heartbreaking—and I would love to figure out why.

I can think of no better time than Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness month to help fund research that can save lives. Join me in the fight today:

– Candy Culver
Marketing Consultant

Honor Veterans on Memorial Day

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We look forward to Memorial Day as a three-day weekend that kicks off summer. Most of us enjoy days off work filled with sunshine, barbeques, and outdoor activities.

When we pause, we remember it’s about more. It’s really a holiday about honoring men and women who gave their lives for the freedoms we enjoy.

I’m as guilty as the next person in not giving true attention to Memorial Day. But as I get older, I’m determined not to take things so much for granted—so this May 25th, I’m giving it more than lip service and a passing nod to the news stories. That begins with this blog: sharing with you how the holiday came to be, and what we can do to commemorate the day.

graveyard-534616_640_pixabayMemorial Day, started after the Civil War, was first called “Decoration Day.” Originally designed to honor soldiers who died in the war between the North and South, it expanded after World War I to include American casualties of any war or military action.

Honoring Veterans

Taking time to attend a Memorial Day parade is one small way to give veterans the recognition they deserve. It offers a chance to talk with any young kids about family members or friends who served in the military, and to connect with what the holiday means. If there’s no parade in your area, you can watch the National Memorial Day Parade on TV.

At 3 p.m. local time on May 25, you can observe the National Moment of Remembrance, for one minute.

Share a family story: Go to the Hometown Heroes website and post a photograph and the basic information about your veteran’s service record (it’s free). They want your stories, and are creating a searchable database of military veterans.

More ways to honor veterans:

  • Upload an image of the American flag on your Twitter and/or Facebook profile
  • Place flowers on the gravestone of a veteran
  • Fly your flag at half-staff until noon and/or fly the POW/MIA flag
  • Write a thank you letter to a veteran or a current member of the armed forces and send it to A Million Thanks
  • Visit a military museum, memorial or historic site

Have you heard of the Education Center they’re building at the Wall? Watch this short video to learn about what they’re doing.

The Center will honor the legacy of military service and make sure future generations do not forget what fallen soldiers of Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan have done for us. It will share hundreds of thousands of objects left at the Vietnam Wall, and include photos of more than 58,000 people who gave their lives during the Vietnam War. It’s a very tangible way to honor veterans: give to the Education Center.

Donate Now

Helping Veterans

Returning service men and women face many challenges. We know re-connecting, transitioning and rebuilding their lives is not just a step-back-into-it task. They often have physical and mental battle scars—and need housing, employment, health care and mental health services.

Government programs are helping, but it also takes nonprofit organizations to provide all the services they need. So this Memorial Day, consider making a donation to provide the care, support and assistance veterans need as another way to honor their sacrifices.

Give Now

– Candy Culver
Marketing Consultant

Working together for Nepal: JustGive and partners raise more than $230k

A Nepalese woman says morning prayers Saturday at a temple in Bhaktapur, Nepal, that was reduced to rubble in the April 25 earthquake. Bernat Armangue/AP

A Nepalese woman says morning prayers Saturday at a temple in Bhaktapur, Nepal, that was reduced to rubble in the April 25 earthquake. Bernat Armangue/AP

Here at JustGive, we’re in a unique position when something tragic like the recent Nepal earthquake occurs. Not only is our website an easy way to make donations to any charity, but JustGive also works with many corporate partners to power their employee and customer giving programs.

Shortly after the 7.8 quake struck Nepal on Saturday April 25, 2015, we mobilized our own team to prepare the justgive.org website for donations. We identified 12 charities providing direct support in Nepal that included the American Red Cross, Doctors Without Borders, World Vision and Save the Children—and placed banners throughout our site to encourage donations.

We also reached out to our corporate partners to facilitate giving programs for their employees and customers.

Discover, through their year-round Discover Giving Site for cardholders, pledged to waive transaction fees on any donations made to The American Red Cross and World Vision through May 30, 2015. If you have a Discover card, visit discover.justgive.org to make a donation today.

REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar

REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar

Longtime JustGive partner American Express, for whom we power a giving site for cardholders at membersgive.com, also called out to their members to support Nepal. On the Members Give website, Amex cardholders can donate with dollars, or use their Membership Rewards points to make a donation.

Pointworthy, a JustGive partner that enables consumers to use their loyalty rewards for charitable donations, moved quickly to launch a Nepal giving campaign. On the website, members of the Citibank ThankYou Rewards and Hilton HHonors programs can turn their reward points into a donation to support Nepal.

One of our newest partners, The Hollywood Fund, also mobilized their resources to raise money for Nepal. Hollywood Fund, comprised of a group of media companies including FX Networks, TCM, and Rachel Ray, created a fundraising page to support victims of the quake. The fund then works with its media partners to run online campaigns that drive viewers to the donation page.

Thanks to donors coming through JustGive and our partners’ websites, we have currently collected more than $230,000 in donations specifically designated to support Nepal as it recovers from this devastating quake.

It’s never too late to help. Visit any of the links below to contribute to charities aiding Nepal’s recovery efforts:

JustGive Blog: Help Nepal Earthquake Victims

Discover Giving Site
American Express Members Give
Pointworthy: Donate with Citibank ThankYou Rewards and Hilton HHonors
Hollywood Fund

-Sarah Bacon
Director of Product

An injured girl is carried to a helicopter following the earthquake in Sindhupalchowk, not far from Kathmandu (Danish Siddiqui/Reuters)

An injured girl is carried to a helicopter following the earthquake in Sindhupalchowk, not far from Kathmandu (Danish Siddiqui/Reuters)

Help Nepal Earthquake Victims

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UPDATE: 
Another 7.3 earthquake has rocked Nepal, striking close to Mt. Everest. This powerful tremor triggered landslides and toppled buildings, and was followed by at least five aftershocks that killed dozens and injuring more than 1,000. Already shell-shocked people are struggling and traumatized—and will likely be sleeping outside to stay safe. They need your help.


Help Nepal Earthquake Victims

A 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck Nepal Saturday morning, April 25, near the capital of Kathmandu. The quake is the largest to hit the poor South Asian country in more than 80 years. As casualty numbers rise, it has killed over 5,000 people in Nepal, Tibet, Bangladesh and at the Nepal-China border—and injured nearly 6,000.  The quake also triggered a huge avalanche that killed at least 18 climbers in the Mount Everest area. Entire villages are destroyed.

Powerful aftershocks continue to jolt residents, many who are sleeping outside and in new tent villages. CNN producer Ingrid Formanek who arrived Sunday night, said Kathmandu “looks like a city where buildings have been abandoned. People are hanging out in public squares and at intersections to avoid rubble from buildings.” The earthquake and aftershocks have turned one of the world’s most scenic areas into a scene of massive destruction.

Rescue, relief and recovery efforts are underway, and families and children urgently need your help. Here are 12 charities providing life-saving emergency services, including vital shelter, food, water, sanitation supplies, and medical care:

button_donate_nowThe American Red Cross is working with the Nepal Red Cross and the global Red Cross network to coordinate support.

button_donate_nowAmeriCares has sent it response team and shipments of medical aid and relief supplies for survivors.

button_donate_nowCARE has worked in Nepal since 1978, and is providing life-saving food, water, shelter and health care.

button_donate_nowCatholic Relief Services is sending relief materials such as shelter kits, water, sanitation and hygiene supplies.

button_donate_nowDoctors without Borders has mobilized eight teams from nearby countries to help, including surgical teams and non-medical staff – along with emergency supplies.

button_donate_nowHumane Society International stands ready to support local agencies or animal welfare groups and help with animal-related needs in the strike zone.

button_donate_nowMercy Corps’ team is on the ground, focused on delivering rapid, lifesaving aid to hard-hit communities.

button_donate_nowOperation USA and its partners in the country are helping distribute essential supplies for victims and hospitals.

button_donate_nowOxfam International has a team in the country and is responding with clean water, sanitation materials and emergency food.

button_donate_nowSave the Children is protecting vulnerable children and providing relief to families with emergency kits, hygiene materials and tarps.

button_donate_nowShelterBox is distributing aid, including tents they have prepositioned in the country that can serve as emergency clinics.

button_donate_nowWorld Vision is providing first aid kits, sleeping mats, blankets and jerry cans; temporary shelter; and protection for children.

Time to Act: Prevent Sexual Assaults

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Image Source: Flickr

When we hear the term sexual assault, most of us think of rape by a stranger. The reality is that about 2/3 of assaults are committed by someone known to the victim. Sexual assault isn’t just limited to rape, either—it includes child abuse, sexual harassment, teen relationship violence, date rape and domestic violence. Every 107 seconds, another American is sexually assaulted.

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month, and this year, the campaign focuses on preventing sexual violence on campus.

Some starling statistics

Recent news stories of the alleged fraternity gang rape at the University of Virginia (Rolling Stone reporting snafu aside) and the Stanford University athlete caught mid rape have certainly fueled the conversation about sexual assault on college campuses.

Image Source: Flickr

Image Source: Flickr

The campus sexual assault study revealed:

  • 1 in 5 women are sexually assaulted while in college
  • 1 in 16 men are sexually assaulted while in college

The majority of these college victims never report the assault. In the big picture, sexual assault is one of the most under reported crimes: 68% of assaults in the last five years were not reported to the police. And only about 2% of rapists will ever serve a day in prison.

What can we do about it?

Educating our children about this is imperative. While it’s a tough and awkward topic to tackle, we need to talk about it. That’s one of the best ways to truly protect them.

Image Source: Flickr

Image Source: Flickr

RAINN, the Rape Abuse & Incest National Network, suggests ways to get the conversations started: teaching your child to say no, and to come to you with questions and concerns.

The King County Sexual Assault Resource Center booklet, He Told Me Not To Tell, is another good parent’s guide. It includes specific ideas about storytelling and playing the What If game.

The National Sexual Violence Resource Center’s What is Healthy Sexuality and Consent fact sheet contains great information for teenagers.

What else?

Help charities who are addressing the issue of sexual assault do more outreach, create educational materials, and provide the services for victims that make a difference. Give today so they can speak with a louder voice and help prevent sexual assaults.

National Sexual Violence Resource Center is the organization behind Sexual Assault Awareness Month, and offers a wealth ofbutton_give_now_small information for preventing sexual violence. It is operated by the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Rape.

Rape Abuse & Incest National Network is the nation’s largest anti-sexual violence organization and operatesbutton_give_now_small the National Sexual Assault Hotline in partnership with 1,100 local rape crisis centers across the country.

Love is Respect is a great resource to for engaging, educating and empowering young adults about how to prevent and endbutton_give_now_small abusive relationships. Brought to you by Break the Cycle.

– Candy Culver

Marketing Consultant

The Diabetes Epidemic: Risks & Resources

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Image Source: Flickr

Each year, the American Diabetes Association designates a day in March as Diabetes Alert Day. It’s a wake-up call for all of us to find out if we’re at risk for developing Type 2 Diabetes. And that’s important since 1 out of 4 people with diabetes don’t know they have it!

Every 17 seconds someone in the United States is diagnosed with diabetes. To you, that may sound like just another statistic – but it’s personal for me. I live with someone who has diabetes and wasn’t diagnosed until his late 40s. He’s one of nearly 30 million American children and adults with the disease (10 percent of the U.S. population). Worldwide, nearly 400 million people are living with diabetes.

The bad news: Diabetes can develop at any age for both Type 1 (previously known as juvenile diabetes) and Type 2.

For Type 1, the body doesn’t make enough insulin and there’s no known way to keep it from happening. For Type 2, the body can’t use insulin properly. At least one out of every three of us will develop Type 2 diabetes in our lifetime.

The good news for Type 2: In most cases, it’s preventable.

Are you at risk for Type 2 diabetes?

It only takes minutes to take a Risk Test and answer a few questions about weight, age, family history and other risk factors.

Image Source: Flickr

Image Source: Flickr

If the test says you’re at increased risk, talk to your doctor. There are several definitive ways to diagnose diabetes.

While there is no cure yet for the disease, you can manage it. From my nearly 10 years of experience living with someone who has diabetes, it’s not that hard. Balancing the food you eat with exercise and medicine (if prescribed) helps control weight and keep blood glucose levels in the healthy range. Many people with diabetes live long and active lives.

You can make an impact for diabetes

There are many charities helping educate us about diabetes, providing services, and working to find a cure. Here are three:

American Diabetes Association: The American Diabetes Association delivers services to hundreds of communities, helps fund research, and is a go-to source for information about diabetes.  Raising awareness is one of the organization’s main efforts, guided by its vision of a life free of diabetes and all its burdens.

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Diabetes Research Institute Foundation: The Diabetes Research Institute Foundation, founded in 1971 by a small group of parents of children with diabetes, has evolved into an international coalition of families, patients, business leaders, celebrities, scientists, clinicians and more. Its sole focus is on finding a biological cure.

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Joslin Diabetes Center: In 1898, Elliot P. Joslin, M.D., launched the effort to understand, treat and potentially cure diabetes. He started by taking his written patient observations to the lab to conduct research. Today, Joslin’s research team of more than 300 scientists make it the most comprehensive program dedicated to diabetes in the world.

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Want to get involved in diabetes efforts in your community and volunteer? Check out events in your community from American Diabetes Association. 

According to the Centers for Disease Control, diabetes is currently the 7th leading cause of death in the United States, taking the lives of more Americans every year than AIDs and breast cancer combined. Let’s change that – and give of our time and money to make a difference.

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-Candy Culver

Marketing Consultant

One From the Heart – February is American Heart Month

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Image Source: Flickr

I’ll be the first to admit it. I get stressed.

Stress affects our health in many ways, but heart disease is a common result in the United States, particularly among women. As a woman, this is a stressor in itself. Worries and perfectionism aside, what are some simple, everyday ways you and I can decrease our stress and be kind to our hearts?

A plant-heavy or plant-based diet is a wonderfully heart-healthy eating plan. Personally, I switched from a vegetarian to a vegan diet 2 years ago, and everything I continue to learn about its health benefits encourages me to keep at it. Avocado and olive oil are my favorite plant-based ways to lower “bad” (LDL) cholesterol while leaving heart levels of “good” (HDL) cholesterol intact.

Image Source: Flickr

Image Source: Flickr

Hobbies that include movement are a low-stress way to get your heart pumping stronger. Dance class (or dancing around the house), gardening, vigorous cleaning and yoga or stretching are some relatively low-impact and low-cost ways to get your circulation up and flex your heart muscle.

But what about the mental stress? It’s the biggest factor in many of our busy lives. Mindfulness meditation is one way to change your mindset and even regulate the rhythm of your heart. Look for a zen or yoga center in your area for more information. Lucky for me, San Francisco is home to a beautiful Zen Center that hosts a variety of programs, classes and retreats.

My personal favorite fact about preventative heart health? Doing good for others lowers your stress levels.

This is something we can all do anytime and it doesn’t have to cost money – sharing time is just as valuable.

Image Source: Flickr:

Image Source: Flickr

If you’d like to find volunteer opportunities in your area, you can use our Act Locally search option and contact local charities to see how you can help. Bonus points on volunteering: It gets you outside – and being in nature is another great de-stressor.Even if you live in a city, you can likely find an urban gardening project to volunteer your time. Check out The National Gardening Association’s Kids Gardening program, which empowers every generation to lead healthier lives, build stronger communities, and encourage environmental stewardship through gardening programs.

If you’d like to support their efforts:

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The most sobering fact I uncovered in my research: women are more prone to suffer from undiagnosed heart disease. Women’s symptoms tend to differ from men’s, and women are more likely to suffer a silent heart attack.

In fact, heart attacks are responsible for the loss of half a million women per year in the U.S. alone. Heart disease is the number one killer of women even though many women are more afraid of breast cancer.

Image Source: Flickr

Image Source: Flickr

I lost a friend and community member, far before her time, to silent heart disease. After her untimely passing a few years ago, another friend organized memorial donations in her honor to WomenHeart: the National Coalition for Women with Heart Disease. It’s a charity that provides support and research and was started by three women who have personal experience with heart disease issues. Women Heart was the first – and is still the only – national patient-centered organization focused exclusively on women’s heart disease.

If you’d like to donate to help WomenHeart carry out its work:

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Education, information and advocacy are our greatest weapons against killer heart disease. Together, we can multiply our strengths in fighting the battle against heart disease with a unified front. We have to watch out for each other, right?

-Alex Mechanic

Customer Service Manager

THE MANY FACES OF HOMELESSNESS: HOW YOU CAN HELP

blog_title_image_homelessnessKnowing how to help a homeless person can sometimes feel difficult, confusing and overwhelming. The dollar you give might be used to buy drugs or alcohol. Even offering food can be a problem – imagine handing an apple to a homeless man and then discovering he has no teeth. Just as there are many reasons people become homeless, there are also many ways to help. Understanding the leading causes of homelessness is often the best way to learn what the homeless need and how you can make a positive difference in their lives. The chronically homeless, who often struggle with mental health or substance abuse issues, need a safe and stable living environment where they can get counseling and health care. To help them, consider volunteering at a local shelter or halfway house that provides longer-term housing. Donating clean towels, pillows and blankets can also help create a comfortable and safe living environment. The majority of homeless youth bw_homeless_teens_21461332have been kicked out of their homes or abandoned by parents or guardians. Others who left on their own accord have suffered physical and emotional abuse at the hands of their families. For many, trusting another adult or authority figure can be difficult. One of the best ways to help is to simply ask them what they need. Maybe it’s a hot meal, a warm coat or a clean pair of socks; or maybe it’s information on how to get into foster care, enroll in a drug and alcohol detox program or register for the GED. Taking the time to listen to their needs, and to follow through, can go a long way in helping them regain their trust in others and get off the streets. imm needs housing homelessFor many veterans, physical disability, mental anguish and post-traumatic stress can make readjusting to civilian life very difficult. This can lead to drug and alcohol addiction, the inability to hold down a steady job and homelessness. Because many veterans have very specific needs to help them get back on their feet—job placement services, medical services, housing assistance, counseling—there are numerous ways to get involved. Consider donating your time or money to organizations which help homeless vets:

While we need to address the problem of homelessness as a whole, the more we can understand each person’s individual circumstances, the more we can help. Before making assumptions or judgments, take the time to ask some questions and do a little research. It can make all the difference. The Face(s) of Homelessness

  • Number of homeless in the United States: 610,042
  • Number of chronic homeless: 109,132 (18%)
  • Number of homeless youth under 18: 380,000
  • Number of homeless veterans: 57,849 (9%)

For more charities helping the homeless with shelter, counseling services and job training.

-Amelia Glynn, Marketing Contractor

Hunger and Food Justice: Community Building for Food Equality

Hunger: it’s a daunting problem the world over. Even though I was eager to research and write on this topic, when I started to dig into it, I got more and more overwhelmed with how broad and profound the issue … Continue reading