Three Ways You Can Save Animals

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The Minnesota dentist who killed Cecil the lion on a hunting trip in July sparked a media flurry and got people clamoring about protection for animals.

Americans are animal lovers. In a recent Gallup poll, 32% of us said we believe animals should have the same rights as humans, and 62% believe they deserve some protection.

I’m one of those people. The story and images of the skeletal 2-year old dog found tied up outside a Georgia church this past weekend made me more than cringe. How can anyone be so cruel and heartless?

cc_rileyWhen you share your life with animals and they’ve captured a special place in your heart, you care about what happens to them.  I know my soft spot for animals has grown exponentially since we got our goldendoodle Riley three years ago. And I can’t imagine what kind of person could neglect, harm, abandon or mistreat any animal.

Animals give us unconditional love and bring joy. They bond with us. They watch over and protect us.  We know animals feel pain and fear, and miss us. Their eyes, expressions and behaviors tell us what they don’t have the voices to say.

Dogs, in particular, give many humans a “new leash” on life. They guide the blind and visually impaired, provide comfort for seniors as well as children who are sick or have to appear in court, improve the lives of people with disabilities and autism, can save diabetics, give independence to veterans, and help parolees turn their lives around.

Yet, sadly, according to the ASPCA, every 60 seconds an animal is abused.

THREE WAYS TO HELP

To save animals, we can be their voice, channeling our passion into action.

1) Watch for signs of abuse.

When you’re out and about, do you see animals left in hot cars or dogs chained up for hours? Have you ever walked by a house and seen so many animals you worry about their care? Pay attention for:

  • Neglect: When an animal is denied adequate food, water, shelter, medical care (injuries left untreated), clean area, socialization (is it aggressive or timid when approached by owner?), or chained up in a yard.
  • Violence: When an animal is deliberately tortured, beaten, or mutilated.

2) Speak up: report animal cruelty.

sb_finnAlmost all acts of animal violence or neglect are punishable by law. Animal cruelty laws vary from state to state, but 49 states have laws that contain felony provisions. (South Dakota is the only one that doesn’t.)

If you suspect abuse or neglect of any animal, report it to your local police department or area animal control agency. If you’re traveling, call the local police department (911).

3) Support animal organizations.

Put your money where your heart is, and donate—giving for animal protection and care. (You can even make an ongoing commitment with a recurring monthly gift.)

rox_pomoIf you don’t know where to start, here are 5 great charities:

I can’t stop all animal abuse and mistreatment. But I can do my part and support dedicated people who are protecting and caring for amazing animals like my Riley. Won’t you join me?

– Candy Culver
Marketing Consultant

Help Save Animals—Channel Your Care and Passion into Action.

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We have a 2-year old goldendoodle affectionately known as “Sir Riley Flannigan.” Flannigan for his apricot color, Riley’s a mix of poodle and golden retriever that’s taken a place in my life and heart I could never have imagined.

My family had outside cats and dogs when I was growing up on the farm, but until Riley (who doesn’t shed), my allergies kept me from owning an animal as an adult. Now, sharing every day with such a loving, sensitive, energetic, and smart dog that has comforted me through sadness and sickness– I can’t imagine what kind of person could harm or hurt any companion animal.

We know animals love and remember us, and feel pain and fear. Their eyes and expressions tell us what they can’t say. They’re companions who watch over and protect us. Dogs, in particular, give many humans a new “leash” on life—they guide the blind and visually impaired, improve the lives of autistic children, save diabetics, and give independence to people with disabilities and veterans.

There’s no question our pets miss us when we’re gone—watch Bugaboo show and tell his owner, Lieutenant Gary Daughtery, how happy he is to see him after six months overseas:

http://on.aol.com/video/soldier-comes-home-to-warm-welcome-from-dog-517865377

 

Honestly, the many types of animal abuse and cruelty—what we know, see, read and hear about—can be overwhelming. I sometimes turn away from TV ads and scroll quickly past Facebook posts because they get to me. And I feel pretty helpless to stop all the abuse. There are a lot of issues to tackle.

How do we move past anger and overwhelm about how animals are treated to help save them? We can start with what we see every day and be their voice—using our passion to take action.

Learn and Recognize Signs of Pet Abuse

Pay attention to the animals around you. Are there any dogs you’ve seen chained up for hours on end? Have you ever walked your dog and witnessed another aggressive, out of control one? Or gone by a house where there are so many animals you worry about their care? These could be signs of neglect or violence.

  • Neglect is denying an animal adequate food, water, shelter (a dog house), medical care (injuries left untreaDogted), clean area, socialization (is the animal aggressive or timid when approached by owner), or chained up in a yard.
  • Violence is deliberately torturing, beating, or mutilating an animal.

Speak Up: Report Abuse

Almost all acts of animal violence or neglect are punishable by law. While animal cruelty laws vary from state to state, 49 states have laws that contain felony provisions. (South Dakota is the only one that doesn’t). Be prepared: Search online at Pets911 or PetFinder’s database to find a local animal control department, animal shelter or humane society in your area—and program the number into your cell phone.

If you suspect abuse or neglect of any animal, report it to your local police department or area animal control agency. If you’re traveling, call the local police department (911).

If you know of dog or cock fighting, call The Humane Society hotline at 1-877-TIP-HSUS and report it.

Donate—Support Organizations Working to Stop the Abuse

According to the ASPCA, every 60 seconds an animal is abused. Put your money where your heart is, and give for the education, protection, and care Stray Kittenof animals. (Consider an ongoing monthly gift.) If you don’t know where to start:

While animal issues may seem staggering and even depressing, you and I can take action to make life better for them—to end suffering and save these amazing creatures, one by one.  And the next time I sit with Riley or get a doggie kiss, I’ll feel good knowing I’m doing something to help precious creatures like him.

-Candy Culver

Marketing Consultant

 

Saving lives, large and small

My family always had pets. Cats, dogs, birds, fish, and a hamster named Lucky. I can’t remember a time when I didn’t love animals. I vividly remember my first trip to the shelter. We adopted a kitten, who became my best friend. But I left wondering why we couldn’t take them all home … “Who will take care of them if I don’t?” When I got older, I made my first donation to the ASPCA, and 10 years later I’m still an active member.

Animals enrich our lives in countless ways. They provide security and safety to those with disabilities, comfort and companionship to young and old. A recent article by The National Institutes of Health featured the health benefits of owning a pet.  “The bond between animals and humans is part of our evolution, and it’s very powerful,” says Dr. Ann Berger, a physician and researcher at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland.

Every May since 1915, the Humane Society celebrates “Be Kind to Animals Week.” It has become a month-long campaign to raise awareness about the profound connection between animals and humans. Join me in taking action to protect, defend and celebrate the lives of all animals, large and small. There are many ways you can help:

Give

In response to the current housing crisis, the Humane Society set up a “foreclosure pet fund” to provide financial assistance to pet owners facing eviction. This fund has distributed more than $100,000 to 57 regional shelters and animal rescue clinics. Your $10 or $25 donation helps set up pet food banks, assists with the cost of temporary boarding, and reduces the costs of emergency medical care. Or you can support your local animal shelter, or give to an organization that prevents cruelty to animals.

Speak Up

In 2008, California voters approved Proposition 2 – legislation that will prevent farm animal cruelty, ensure health and food safety, support family farmers, and protect our air and water. I recently called my state representative to urge a yes vote on two important bills – CA A.B. 241, to crack down on puppy mills, and CA A.B. 233, to offer a tax deduction for adopting shelter pets. Find out about current legislation in your state, and vote to give animals a voice.

Volunteer

Every other weekend I volunteer with FOCAS. My local pet store lets the organization set up an adoption center for shelter cats. Even if you only have a few hours a month, Volunteer Match makes it easy to find an animal organization near you.

Teach

Share your love of animals with children, and they will grow up knowing what it means to care and be compassionate towards others. Read through 50 Ways to Save Animals with your kids today and make a difference for animals tomorrow.

Pass the message along to friends with furry, feathered or fishy family.

– Sarah Myers

Program Manager