#GivingTuesday Tips for Success

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Less than 4 weeks to go until #GivingTuesday. Here’s what you need to know.

GivingTuesday, the global day of giving, is November 29th. It offers a huge opportunity to increase awareness for your cause and support for your organization while reaching out to new and current donors. There are many ways to get your staff and the community involved in your #GivingTuesday. The three areas of focus we’re highlighting are fundraising, collaboration and communication.
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Launching a #GivingTuesday campaign helps kick off your year-end fundraising campaign and creates awareness within your community. Customize your donation page and take advantage of our free Donate Now button features. Add a #GivingTuesday top graphic and message on your page, customize your donation amounts and descriptions, and include a special program designation for #GivingTuesday.

The more your donors feel connected to the #GivingTuesday theme and tie-in, the more likely they are to participate in the movement.

Join our webinar: “An introduction to JustGive’s Donate Now button” on Wednesday, November 9 at 2pm ET. We’ll show you how to customize your Donate Now button so you can raise more donations and reduce fundraising fees.

Collaborate
Rally your community and get others involved. Reach out to local businesses for support or collaborate with other local nonprofits and present a united front to the local merchants association. Offering a good word may be enough for a local business to invest in a community board announcing #GivingTuesday and give 10% of net proceeds from sales on the day or offer a matching gift.

Set a goal and ask a board member or corporate sponsor to match donations for the day. You can use this to incentivize new or larger donations during your campaign.

Communicate
Social media is the key to making sure your message is received and shared to new audiences. Build momentum with your supporters in advance and communicate a consistent message across several channels, including email. Starting with your email list, get the word out about #GivingTuesday and don’t forget to encourage your #GivingTuesdayaudience to share.

Make your posts compelling and share-worthy. Give donors a clear message and encourage them to tweet, post, snap and share.

For more tips and tools, #GivingTuesday offers free toolkits, sample messages, promos, and more.

Don’t miss out on other helpful tips and tools: To automatically receive an email when we post more, subscribe to our Nonprofit Blog.

Andrea Lloyd
Business Development Director

JustGive and JustGiving join forces: what this means for you

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We at JustGive are excited to announce we have joined JustGiving, the world’s largest social giving platform.  JustGiving operates the website www.JustGiving.com.

Both organizations were founded at about the same time over 15 years ago, with an identical goal: to grow charitable giving by connecting people with the charities and causes they care most about.

Headquartered in London, UK, JustGiving has helped 27m people in 165 countries raise $4bn for NPOs and grassroots projects since its launch in 2001. The company has built a solid reputation for its commitment to technology innovation and the early use of advanced analytics to grow charitable giving.

kendallOur CEO Kendall Webb said: “In the US, JustGiving is one of the non-profit world’s best kept secrets. Our new collaboration aims to change that. We are proud to be joining forces to grow our positive social impact by combining JustGive’s unique experience and knowledge with JustGiving’s ground-breaking platform.”

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Zarine Kharas, co-founder of JustGiving said, “Our belief is that giving is global, and we cannot wait to grow our community of users, NPOs and corporations in the USA, and help them raise more money together for the causes they are passionate about.”

What will change for donors?

Nothing about the website or donor accounts will change, apart from the changes to our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. www.justgive.org will still be the place for donors to make contributions to their favorite charities, and to search for and donate to over 2 million U.S. charities. JustGive.org will also continue to offer charity gift cards, charity fundraisers (including wedding fundraisers), and all the other helpful features that make it easy to donate to charity.

What will change for the Nonprofits that use JustGive’s services?

Nothing at all will change, apart from the changes to our NPO Terms of Use, Donor Terms of Service, and Privacy Policy. In particular, our fees are not changing.  If you are an NPO you will continue to receive donations through JustGive.org, your npo.JustGive.org donation page (if you have set one up), and our various other partner programs. When a donation is made to your organization we’ll still send you a check on the 10th of the following month for the donations that were made in the previous month.

Please take a moment to review our updated terms which reflect the fact that your JustGive service will now be provided by JG US, Inc, JustGiving’s US subsidiary: You can find our updated terms here:

We are excited for this new chapter for JustGive, and continuing our mission to increase charitable giving by connecting people with the charities and causes they care most about.

Kendall Webb
Founder and CEO
www.justgive.org

Latest Trends in Workplace Giving

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America’s Charities recently released Snapshot 2015 – The New Corporate DNA: Where Employee Engagement and Social Impact Converge. The third in a series, this year’s report includes insights, trends and best practices for workplace philanthropy and employee engagement.

Findings were collected from an online survey of executives from 120 companies in the third quarter of 2015. Their responses represent more than 600,000 employees and 17 unique industry groups, geographically dispersed, and equally distributed between large companies (more than 5,000 employees) and small to midsize companies (5,000 and fewer employees).

Snapshot 2015 makes the case:  It’s not enough to say giving of time, money and skills is important. Leaders must be involved in employee engagement, authentically, and it must be embedded in a company’s DNA—part of its culture, values and actions.

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One of the most prominent trends, according to Steve Delfin, President and CEO of America’s Charities, is the changing expectations around social impact:

  • Companies want more evidence their charity resources help with strategic social responsibility goals.
  • Employees want more transparency, accountability and proof their donations are helping make a social impact.

Millennials care about social impact—and companies are expected to do more to engage their employees and support causes they care about. Their CSR efforts create a valuable competitive business edge for recruiting and retaining talent.  And 92% of Snapshot 2015 respondents (from small to large companies) believe customers expect them to be good corporate citizens too. So companies need to step up with more sophisticated and responsive engagement programs.

What a difference two years makes

snapshot2015

Click to download PDF

When it comes to workplace giving, for many years, a payroll deduction program was the most common way to engage employees. Those programs have grown steadily. But now they’re only part of the picture.

According to Snapshot 2015, giving programs have changed quite a bit in the past two years. Today, almost two thirds of small, medium and large companies offer employees year-round giving opportunities; this is becoming the standard. Compare that with 2013, when just over one third of companies were moving beyond fall campaigns to year-round giving. Differences by size of company:

  • 85% of large companies offer year-round giving, and 70% have matching campaigns.
  • 44% of small to midsize companies offer year-round giving, and 28% have matching campaigns.

Survey respondent and Director of Corporate Responsibility for PwC US, Heather Lofkin Wright commented, “Giving at the office is about the change we can affect when we work together. . . meaningful ways to be a part of that collective impact.”

platformsYear-round volunteering has emerged as a core part of employee engagement programs. Something that was just coming into the picture in Snapshot 2013, volunteer opportunities are now offered by 92% of large companies and 60% of small to midsize ones.

For all the best practices in workplace giving and to read the latest findings, download the complete Snapshot 2015. And take a look at other reports in the Snapshot series.

Contact us if you’re ready to improve your company giving program or looking for ways to better engage your employees.

– Andrea Lloyd
Director of Programs

P.S. To keep up on the latest philanthropy insights, subscribe to our Blog and follow JustGive on LinkedIn.

 

Helpful CSR & Sustainability Groups

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Business for Social Responsibility and GlobeScan recently released the 7th annual State of Sustainable Business Report.

The survey revealed what major companies think about sustainability and corporate social responsibility (CSR). It collected data from 440 professionals at multinational companies, in a wide range of industries, with varying levels of commitment to sustainability.

One not-so-surprising trend identified by the survey: sustainability is playing an increasingly important role for almost half of the companies (42%). And while almost 70% say sustainability is at least “fairly well integrated,” the desire is to have it more integrated. Other results:

  • 48% of companies said their key performance indicators include sustainability measures
  • 67% reported sustainability efforts was a top three factor in a company’s reputation

We know, from a 2014 Nielson report, that 55% of global online consumers are willing to pay more for products and services from companies committed to positive social and environmental impact.

Human rights remains the top priority for business, though climate change and access to products meeting basic needs are on the rise. (Detail on pg. 9)

Human rights remains the top priority for business, though climate
change and access to products meeting basic needs are on the rise. (Detail on pg. 9)

And there’s no shortage of research, ratings and rankings related to sustainable business. The current $250 million sustainability information market now includes some 150 rating systems covering more than 50,000 companies.

So how can sustainability and CSR “warriors” find what’s most useful (in practice) and help raise their company’s commitment to something so important?

Social responsibility and sustainability membership associations/organizations are one good way. Here are some of the best in this space:

Business for Social Responsibility (BSR)

bsr-greenbiz-banner_0A global nonprofit organization, BSR works with a network of more than 250 companies to build a just and sustainable world. With offices in Asia, Europe, and North America, BSR develops sustainable business strategies and solutions through consulting, research, and cross-sector collaboration. Members get access to thought leaders in the industry, sustainability solutions and networking opportunities. BSR’s annual conference, being held November 3-5 in San Francisco, will provide the latest social responsibility strategies. Membership information: http://www.bsr.org/en/membership

Committee Encouraging Corporate Philanthropy

CECP LogoCECP’s mission is to create a better world through business. The nonprofit organization is a coalition of CEOs who lead by example and believe improving society is an essential measure of business performance. Founded in 1999 by Paul Newman, CECP consists of more than 150 CEOs of the world’s largest companies across all industries. CECP offers members one-on-one consultation, networking events, exclusive measurement data, and case studies on corporate engagement. Membership is by invitation only. Membership information: http://cecp.co/membership/join-cecp.html

Conscious Capitalism

cclogoA nonprofit organization, Conscious Capitalism is dedicated to helping businesses use their power to serve humanity. It’s a group of companies, nonprofits and other organizations who believe there’s a better way to conduct business, guided by higher purpose, a stakeholder orientation, conscious leadership and conscious culture. Conscious Capitalism offers programs and events, and supports a growing network of chapters, which serve as learning communities. Membership information: http://www.consciouscapitalism.org/membership

Corporate Responsibility Association (CRA)

cra logoCRA promotes the practice and profession of corporate responsibility.  Members can choose to participate in Thought Leadership Councils for specific issues or CEO Responsibility Roundtables. The nonprofit association also provides e-newsletters, CR Magazine, webinars, and an annual conference.  Membership information: http://corporateresponsibilityassociation.org/join-us/

– Andrea Lloyd
Director of Programs

Kids & Obesity: Two Things Don’t Belong Together

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Truth be told: I was a fat kid. I was called names and made fun of in elementary school. It’s a painful childhood memory.

I don’t remember my parents or doctor talking to me about my weight (they may have). I do remember earning “clean plate club” honors a lot. As I was starting high school, I’d had it with shopping in the Sears section for heavy kids. I was missing out and unhappy about my weight. I didn’t lose it in the best way (I remember Tab and those old Weight Watchers chocolate squares), but did drop 25 pounds before 9th grade.

Yes, those were different times, and salt-laden casseroles and sugary Jell-O were staples at family gatherings and church dinners. At home, Durkee french fried onion rings and shoestring potato sticks in a can were always in the cupboard . . . to top off those casseroles.  They were ready-to-eat bad snacks I grabbed for instant “food.”

As I got older, I learned more about unhealthy habits. Given my experience, I cringed when I read the latest stats from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: more than one third of U.S. children and teens are overweight or obese, and obesity has doubled in children and quadrupled in adolescents over the last 30 years!

Sadly, a New England Journal of Medicine article says the road to obesity starts before age 5.

Childhood obesity is more upsetting because the extra pounds often start kids on the path to health problems that were once only adult issues, like diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol. And as I know, it can also affect self-esteem.

How can we help our kids?

via KidsHealth.org

via KidsHealth.org

It may come as no surprise that new guidelines published last Monday, June 29, by the American Academy of Pediatrics say we need to focus on prevention.

This starts by understanding when a child is considered obese—when a child is well above the normal weight for his or her age and height, as measured by body mass index (BMI). The standards are:

  • Overweight = BMI-for-age between 85th and 94th percentiles
  • Obese = BMI-for-age 95th percentile or above

(You can use this tool from Kid’s Health to check your children.)

Make better food choices and exercise

vegetablesOne of the best strategies to prevent childhood obesity is to lead by example, improving diet and exercise habits of your whole family.

Most of us know to buy fewer sweetened beverages (sodas, juice and sports drinks) and not stock junk food in the house (or buy it in bulk!). We’ve also heard about First Lady Michelle Obama’s Let’s Move initiative stressing physical activity and the recommended 60 minutes of active play time day.

So how do we put good habits into practice? A few practical tips:

  • Don’t ban junk food outright. Instead, limit the number of treats kids are allowed to eat. That way, kids aren’t as tempted to want what they can’t have or overeat when it’s offered by someone else.
  • Keep fresh fruit in reach to grab as a quick snack. Put higher-calorie foods in the back of the frig or pantry. Get good frozen and canned fruits and vegetables (no and no sugar or salt) when fresh isn’t available.
  • via LetsMove.org

    via LetsMove.org

    Make an effort to limit technology time for kids to no more than 2 hours a day, including computers, videos, games, watching TV. Turn off the TV during family meals to prevent distracted eating (and more) – Have you seen Dixie’s Dark for Dinner ads?

  • Plan activities that give everyone exercise, like walking, biking and swimming. Turn a walk after dinner into a family affair.
  • Make sure your kids get enough sleep, since studies suggest there’s a link between obesity and insufficient sleep.

For more: check out these 10 healthy eating tips and take advantage of the thousands of healthy MyPlate recipes on Pinterest.

Physician education

We now know doctors have to get more involved. While weight is an uncomfortable and awkward topic to tackle, physicians need to address it during children’s visits.

kids running 11578647Recent collaborative research between Caroline Shue, associate professor of communication studies at Ball State University and the IU Health Ball Memorial Hospital Family Medicine Residency Center found a hesitancy to discuss weight is compounded by a disconnect with the reason for the visit (e.g., an ear infection for a “solid” child) as well as a lack of doctors’ training and consistent clinic practices to calculate BMI and chart discussions with patients.

The research identified several good ways to fix the problems, including:  targeted training programs for doctors; and doctor’s offices documenting patients’ height, weight, and BMI more frequently and regularly.

Support nonprofits making a difference

We can all help charities working to get kids more active and prevent obesity. Here are three with programs designed to do just that, operating across the country:

American Heart Association
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Boys & Girls Clubs of America
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YMCA of the USA
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We’ve come a long way since I was a little girl, and I’m encouraged by all the attention, education and resources that exist now. Let’s step up, so other kids can skip all the bad stuff that comes from carrying too much weight. Here’s to preventing childhood obesity, and raising healthier future generations!

– Candy Culver
Marketing Consultant

The Community Corps: Free Tech Help for Your Nonprofit

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As a nonprofit organization, you’re often stretched thin, scrimping and saving to cover costs and get the help you need with a variety of tasks. For your technology projects, The Community Corps (TCC) is a great, no-cost resource to bridge the digital divide.

twitter-292994_1280_pixabayOur partner, The Community Corps connects nonprofits to experienced tech volunteers from top companies who can assist with technical training, resources and programming—throughout the country.

Since its start, TCC has matched thousands of volunteers to nonprofits, with a large focus on the advancement of STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) education and fostering the development of women in technology.

Kelli Antonucci, TCC’s Nonprofit Outreach Manager, tells us this is a great time for nonprofits to get tech help.

“We’ve had a huge surge in volunteer interest and are barely keeping up with getting enough projects for them,” Antonucci said.

“This is a wonderful time for nonprofits to post projectsas soon as they are posted, we have volunteers signing up.”

The type of tech help TCC volunteers can provide ranges from training on software platforms like Excel and Salesforce to updating websites to adding enhancements like a calendar or a blog.

macbook-624707_640_pixabayTCC volunteers can also advise nonprofits considering a large software or hardware purchase.

When you post a project on TCC, there are 10 major categories for assistance: technology planning and assessments, STEM career development, website, Microsoft Office, infrastructure, STEM events, Social Media, STEM program design, The Cloud, and data.

Best of all, tech help from The Community Corps is free.  To get started, just create your TCC account and post your request or project to attract volunteers.

– Sarah Bacon
Director of Product

P.S. Don’t miss out on other valuable resources you can use. Subscribe to our blog for more tips and tools! 

Nonprofit Spotlight: Creative Alternatives of New York (CANY)

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Heidi Landis, CANY’s Associate Executive Director, recently talked with me about the organization’s mission and story. Landis was a professional actor in New York who fell in love with drama therapy and became certified as a drama therapist. After starting as an intern, she has now been with CANY for 10 years.

CANY’s story

CANY Photos 7.06 124It began more than 40 years ago, at Mt. Sinai hospital in New York, when a group of actors were welcomed onto the psychiatric units to work with patients. Philanthropist Janet Levy, who started the organization, first brought the artists in, and the program was so successful it was expanded to all inpatient units. Eventually, drama therapists, who had more theory training, took over for the actors.

Ten years ago, CANY started expanding to work with more people – from 5 year old children to veterans and new refugees. Many of the groups they serve are women/domestic violence survivors, and 65% are children who’ve experienced complex trauma (pervasive abuse and violence over time, at a developmental stage). All have underlying trauma in their lives.

CANY now offers its drama therapy programs at more than 15 facilities serving traumatized, mentally ill and underserved populations.

What is drama therapy?

CANY groupDrama therapy is the intentional use of drama and/or theater processes to achieve therapeutic goals. It is active and experimental. CANY’s mission

CANY is all about empowering people who have endured trauma to rebuild their lives.

Through the use of drama therapy and creative expression in a group setting, CANY helps children and adults expand their self-concept, imagine new life possibilities, and build the social and emotional tools they need in order to live meaningful lives.

All staff are licensed creative arts therapists, highly trained in trauma therapy. CANY’s treatment program is a strength-based model, and it’s also relational. Since trauma happens in relationship, CANY’s philosophy is that people must heal in relationship.

IRC.Summer.2008 015CANY partners with hospitals, schools, community centers and treatment centers for biweekly sessions, and CANY therapists visit 2 or 3 sites a day to guide groups. While their offices are in New York City, group sessions are held throughout New York and Connecticut.

In addition to CANY’s therapy groups, the organization trains therapists, clinicians, teachers and artists about 6 times a year, and conducts a seminar series for mental health and social justice experts. Two years ago, CANY sent a group to Uganda, where they trained a group of clinicians in their methods to work with former child soldiers.

CANY’s guiding principles

Creativity is health. The more creative and spontaneous you are in your life, the healthier you are. Drama therapy is a training ground for that.

CANY080310_0202Metaphor is a healing tool. Roles in drama provide a safe container for trauma processing. Through story and fictional characters, poetry, art and music, trauma survivors can try on different roles and learn something about themselves.

Group is the therapeutic agent. All CANY’s services are based in group work that helps participants make connections and create moments that heal.

Results

A research study was recently conducted with CANY partner agencies CARES High School and St. Luke’s Roosevelt  Hospitals. It measured teens’ emotional, behavioral and academic performance changes as a result of CANY’s trauma-informed drama therapy and found:

  • 08benefit 00285% demonstrated gains in regulating their emotions
  • 72% showed improvement in regulating their behavior
  • 63% showed improved peer relationships over time
  • 47% increased their GPA an average of 3%
  • 77% demonstrated improved self-concept
  • 72% had a reduced negative self-image and improved sense of identify

Giving practices and experience

CANY has customized its JustGive Donation page, sharing its mission, describing how drama therapy helps, and telling donors exactly what their gifts can do.

Maria Eleni, Finance & Operations Manager says, “JustGive has enabled us to give our donors a clear and effortless way to contribute to CANY, in addition to our mail and fundraising campaigns (we find some donors prefer making an anonymous gift). JustGive is straightforward and intuitive to use. We’ve never had a problem to even necessitate a support call.”

button_donate_now_yellowIf you’d like to support CANY and help make a difference today for adults and kids through drama therapy.

– Alex Mechanic
Service Team Manager

P.S. If you’d like to be featured in the JustGive Blog, submit your nonprofit!

Behind the Data Curtain: Where JustGive Gets Charity Information

Image Source: Flickr

Image Source: Flickr

Featured FAQ:
JustGive’s Charity Data

If you’ve spent time on the JustGive website, you know that you can search a database of nearly 2 million 501(c)(3) nonprofit organizations, and you’ve probably wondered about our source for the information.

Question
Where does JustGive get all that charity data from?

Answer
We use two sources for the charity data on JustGive: the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Exempt Organizations database and GuideStar®, the premier organization that offers up-to-date information on hundreds of thousands of nonprofits.

The IRS database is available online, and contains the information for registered 501(c)(3) charitable organizations (or “exempt organizations” as they refer to them).

On the IRS website, you can look up a single charity’s information and status, or download the entire database of exempt organizations. The IRS also maintains data on charities that have had their exempt status revoked, and in many cases, reinstated.

We also partner with GuideStar, which puts a more user-friendly face on the IRS data, and gathers information about impact, transparency, governance, and more.

The JustGive website experience

When you search for a charity on JustGive, you’ll often see pages of search results. The results list charities from the GuideStar database that match your search term(s). CharityInfoPopupClick on the charity’s hyper-linked name and a window will pop up with even more vital information, including the organization’s mission, financial data, programs and more. All this data can help you find out more about an organization you may want to support.

Nonprofit Tip

If you’re a nonprofit, it’s a best practice to claim your organization on the GuideStar Exchange and be sure your information is up-to-date. This ensures that donors see the latest information about your organization when they are searching on JustGive, and that you receive checks from us in a timely manner.

For more FAQs, visit our Help Center.

– Sarah Bacon
Director of Product

Community Giving = Good Business

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If you’re hesitating to make community service part of business, a few minutes with Alison Roessler will change your mind. She’ll inspire you to make it your culture and get you fired up about the benefits of giving back in a heartbeat.

I talked with Roessler the other day about what making an impact means to her and why it’s important. As CEO and Founder of the Oakland, California fitness and wellness center Truve, established in 2014, she can’t imagine doing business any other way.

How did you start giving back?
I got started at a young age by my Mom. She was in charge of a holiday gift drive for an Oregon-wide credit union, and I went with her to deliver gifts to families. In high school I chaired a canned food drive, and helped with a pageant to raise money for the ICU at a local hospital. In college, through my sorority, I worked with the blind. Then I went to Costa Rica on a fluke trip, saw the poverty there and wanted to see how I could help. (The nonprofit she started in 2008, The Stars of Tomorrow/Las Estrellas de Manana, is working to break the cycle of poverty one child at a time.)

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Did you build community service into the business when you created Truve?
Yes. It was a driving factor for me in creating the business. I was doing some pro bono work – helping people with diabetes and more – at other fitness places and they were charging me to use the facility. I thought that was crazy! I wanted to make fitness accessible to everyone.

How are you making volunteering and giving back part of the business?
11036916_1635034656718468_2763814053344646237_nWe have a big event every month to give back. Anyone who is part of the Truve family – practitioners, members, and anyone who drops in to attend free classes – can suggest something that’s important to them and we’ll organize a class, run, fundraising drive or event to raise money.  Last month, we taught classes at the Lion’s Center for the Blind, just 2 blocks up the street. This month, we’re giving a drop-in class discount for anyone who brings in a non-perishable food item or arts and crafts supplies for the Lafayette Elementary School.

I made it a requirement for practitioners who are part of the Truve family to do 30 minutes to an hour every week, or 2 to 4 hours of pro bono service a month. Many of us teach free classes (we have 8 to 10 a week), including acupuncture and Reiki. Our Esthetician helps cancer patients and is involved in feral cat rescue. A Spin teacher reads to kids.

What would you say to business owners who think it costs too much to make volunteering a part of their work?
The benefits so outweigh the costs. It’s totally worth it; it comes back to you tenfold. The return my practitioners get from it and the change they’re making in the world. . . they’re happier afterwards, so glad they did it and ready to do it again!

Vitruvian ManGiving back to the community brings the whole culture of the business together. It should be a part of every business model.

What’s the best way to get over any hesitations about it being too hard to get started?
Dive in – head first – for something you’re passionate about. Once you do, it grows from there. You don’t have to be a Microsoft of the world to do this. (Truve is a small business.)

Truve’s name is inspired by Leonardo DaVinci’s Vitruvian Man, an illustration that shows a person’s wingspan is the same as his height,  with the human body in perfect balance. The fitness classes and services Truve provides, and its community service, actually puts all of life in perfect balance.

np_btn_donate_nowIf you’d like to help the Costa Rica nonprofit, The Stars of Tomorrow, donations are happily accepted.

Ready to incorporate giving back into your business? Just contact us.

– Candy Culver
Marketing Consultant

Your Donation Button Options

Image Source: Flickr

Image Source: Flickr

To answer your frequently asked questions, we’re including them in our nonprofit blog. Subscribe to the blog and use it as a place to check for answers. Each month, we’ll feature a question we get asked on a regular basis.

Featured Nonprofit FAQ
Your Donation Button Options

When you’re researching online donation options, of course you want to know what the JustGive Donate Now buttons look like, and how they can be used. We offer you choices:

  • You can add our buttons to your site, emails and more. We have easy-to-copy-and-drop-in-place Donate Now and Donate Monthly buttons. No programming skills required! (With the Donate Monthly button, you can inspire supporters to conveniently and automatically make monthly gifts, giving you a steady stream of money to count on.)
  • You can use your own button design and add a customized JustGive link.

Question
Can I see some examples of organizations using JustGive’s Donate Now buttons?

Answer
Here are several examples of what the buttons look like on our partner nonprofits’ websites:

JustGive’s Donate Now and Monthly Donate buttons:

Visit this nonprofit's website and c lick through for the full experience.

Visit this nonprofit’s website and click through for the full experience.

A nonprofit’s own button with a JustGive link (General Operating Fund) and our Monthly button:

Visit this nonprofit's website and click through for the full experience.

Visit this nonprofit’s website and click through for the full experience.

A nonprofit’s own button with a JustGive link:

Visit this nonprofit's website and click through for the full experience.

Visit this nonprofit’s website and click through for the full experience.

Just log in or sign up today to start using the buttons or links and raise more money for your work.

For more nonprofit FAQs, visit our Help Center

– Alex Mechanic
Service Team Manager