Patagonia’s Unconventional CSR

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Image source: Patagonia.com

California-based Patagonia, which specializes in outdoor apparel, has taken an unexpected and untraditional approach to corporate social responsibility (CSR). Sustainability, giving back and caring for the planet are firmly connected in a company conviction that’s clear for customers and the business world to see. That’s supported by Patagonia initiatives to buy and consume less.

A family business owned by Yvon and Malinda Chouinard, Patagonia’s mission is to “build the best product, cause no unnecessary harm, use business to inspire and implement solutions to the environmental crisis.”BtheChange.jpg

Yvon wrote in the company’s biography, Let My People Go Surfing, “Patagonia exists to challenge conventional wisdom and present a new style of responsible business.” True to form, in 2012, it was one of the first companies in California to become a Certified B Corporation.

Social & Environmental Activism

Knowing the resources it uses and waste it produces, Patagonia believes it has a responsibility to give back. Rather than thinking of what they do as charity or traditional philanthropy, the company calls it “our Earth Tax,” and considers it part of the cost of doing business.

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Image source: Patagonia.com

For the past 30 years, through its membership in 1% For The Planet® (an alliance of businesses), Patagonia has given 1% of sales to the preservation and restoration of the natural environment. To date, the company has donated $70 million in cash and in-kind services to 3,400 grassroots groups. A few stats show how the company supported environmental and social initiatives this past year:

(For a detailed look at Patagonia’s work in 2015, check out its Environmental + Social Initiatives booklet.) 

Sustainable Clothes & Supply Chain

Patagonia is determined to create “the world’s most socially and environmentally responsible supply chain,” and has steered the clothing industry into a more sustainable direction through its actions.


With products and suppliers.
In 1993, Patagonia was the first outdoor clothing manufacturer to use fleece made from post-consumer recycled (PCR) plastic soda bottles. And in 1996, it switched to using organically grown cotton in all cotton products.  It was also one of first major outdoor companies to work with Fair Trade USA on its Fair Trade Certified apparel.

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Image source: Patagonia.com

In 2007, to be more transparent about its supply chain, the company started publishing the environmental impacts of articles of clothing in The Footprint Chronicles® as well as including it on Patagonia’s product pages.

Within the industry. As a founding member of the Sustainable Apparel Coalition—an alliance of 30 companies in the clothing and footwear industries formed in 2010—Patagonia and member companies measure their environmental and social and labor impacts, benchmark performances against each other, and publish the results in a social and environmental performance index.

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Image source: GreenBiz, collateral at the Yerdle-Patagonia event in SF

The company’s belief in environmental conservation and corporate responsibility is integrated into its anti-consumption advertising. Maybe the most recognized of these ads ran on Black Friday in 2011 with the surprising message: “Don’t Buy This Jacket”, encouraging consumers not to buy what they didn’t need.  Patagonia has echoed this message over the years in its “buy used” marketing with eBay, and most recently, through its Worn Wear initiative about repairing clothes. While many think these messages fly in the face of why the company exists, Patagonia firmly believes it’s just the right thing to do.

Making a Bigger Difference

Patagonia’s commitment to inspire and implement environmental solutions reaches beyond the industry. In 2013, the company launched $20 Million and Change, through a holding company, Patagonia Works. It’s dedicated to a singular cause: using business to help solve the environmental crisis. With this fund, Patagonia helps like-minded, responsible start-up companies which want to work with nature rather than using it up.

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Image source: Patagonia.com

Humble about its CSR accomplishments, Patagonia states: “We have a long way to go and we don’t have a map—but we do have a way to read the terrain and take the next step, and then the next.”

If you’re inspired by Patagonia to take steps and give back through your company’s CSR efforts, we’re ready to help. Just contact us.

For more philanthropy news and CSR insights, subscribe to our Company Blog and follow us on LinkedIn.

– Andrea Lloyd
Director of Programs

Latest Trends in Workplace Giving

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America’s Charities recently released Snapshot 2015 – The New Corporate DNA: Where Employee Engagement and Social Impact Converge. The third in a series, this year’s report includes insights, trends and best practices for workplace philanthropy and employee engagement.

Findings were collected from an online survey of executives from 120 companies in the third quarter of 2015. Their responses represent more than 600,000 employees and 17 unique industry groups, geographically dispersed, and equally distributed between large companies (more than 5,000 employees) and small to midsize companies (5,000 and fewer employees).

Snapshot 2015 makes the case:  It’s not enough to say giving of time, money and skills is important. Leaders must be involved in employee engagement, authentically, and it must be embedded in a company’s DNA—part of its culture, values and actions.

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One of the most prominent trends, according to Steve Delfin, President and CEO of America’s Charities, is the changing expectations around social impact:

  • Companies want more evidence their charity resources help with strategic social responsibility goals.
  • Employees want more transparency, accountability and proof their donations are helping make a social impact.

Millennials care about social impact—and companies are expected to do more to engage their employees and support causes they care about. Their CSR efforts create a valuable competitive business edge for recruiting and retaining talent.  And 92% of Snapshot 2015 respondents (from small to large companies) believe customers expect them to be good corporate citizens too. So companies need to step up with more sophisticated and responsive engagement programs.

What a difference two years makes

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Click to download PDF

When it comes to workplace giving, for many years, a payroll deduction program was the most common way to engage employees. Those programs have grown steadily. But now they’re only part of the picture.

According to Snapshot 2015, giving programs have changed quite a bit in the past two years. Today, almost two thirds of small, medium and large companies offer employees year-round giving opportunities; this is becoming the standard. Compare that with 2013, when just over one third of companies were moving beyond fall campaigns to year-round giving. Differences by size of company:

  • 85% of large companies offer year-round giving, and 70% have matching campaigns.
  • 44% of small to midsize companies offer year-round giving, and 28% have matching campaigns.

Survey respondent and Director of Corporate Responsibility for PwC US, Heather Lofkin Wright commented, “Giving at the office is about the change we can affect when we work together. . . meaningful ways to be a part of that collective impact.”

platformsYear-round volunteering has emerged as a core part of employee engagement programs. Something that was just coming into the picture in Snapshot 2013, volunteer opportunities are now offered by 92% of large companies and 60% of small to midsize ones.

For all the best practices in workplace giving and to read the latest findings, download the complete Snapshot 2015. And take a look at other reports in the Snapshot series.

Contact us if you’re ready to improve your company giving program or looking for ways to better engage your employees.

– Andrea Lloyd
Director of Programs

P.S. To keep up on the latest philanthropy insights, subscribe to our Blog and follow JustGive on LinkedIn.

 

Year in Review: A Look Back at 2015

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Thanks to your giving and support, JustGive sent more than $30 million to charity in 2015!

Our charity gift cards continued to be popular in 2015, showing a 300%+ increase thanks in part to a much-improved process for companies and individuals to order gift cards in bulk through the JustGive website.

This year, we redesigned our Fundraisers product, making it easier to raise funds for charity through a nonprofit campaign or for a special occasion or cause, an upcoming wedding, or in memory of a loved one.

We also improved the Nonprofit Services section of our website to make it simpler for our member charities to use JustGive’s online donation tools to collect and track their donations.

And we’re proud to have helped our many partners by developing and supporting corporate giving programs as part of their social responsibility efforts.

Here’s a glimpse of our impact—and what we accomplished together— in 2015.

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We’re working hard in 2016 to do more good, and continue fulfilling our mission to make charitable giving a part of everyday life.

Thank you for giving!

– Andrea Lloyd
Director of Programs

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Does JustGive support donation matching campaigns? Cost?

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FEATURED CORPORATE FAQ:

Does JustGive support donation matching campaigns? Cost?

Today’s workforce is paying a lot more attention to a company’s CSR efforts and its campaigns to support social causes. And studies show corporate citizenship makes a difference in business success.

corp_citizenIn a survey of millennials, Deloitte found they choose to work for organizations that make a positive contribution to society. So your future leaders are looking for all the ways your company shows you’re serious about it.

Your giving campaigns are key to demonstrating your commitment. How do you set them up to be most effective, with company-matching donations and rewards for the volunteer hours of your employees? That’s where JustGive—and our experience—can help.

Question
Does JustGive support donation matching campaigns? What are the costs?

Answer
Yes, we can process matching donations or volunteer hours for your giving program. The costs vary, depending on the scope and duration of your giving program.

We support all types of donation campaigns—for your cause marketing or social responsibility efforts, a disaster, and more. Processing matching donations for them may be as simple as sending a monthly file to JustGive with details, and having us disburse checks to your charities.

We can also set up a branded, customized site for a year-round charitable campaign that includes your company match.

For one of our partners, Cisco, we have provided employee giving program support for years. Check out what they have to say about their experience.

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Cost
For matching donation campaign support, there is an annual fee for licensing our Donor Advised Fund (DAF), and there may be fees for program setup and customization. We would also apply a per-check or flat processing fee.

For a giving program that lets employees or customers donate to any charity or choose from a list of specific charities, there may be a cost associated with licensing the charity data. And to cover processing for credit card donations, we take a small percentage from each donation.

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Contact us to talk about what you’d like to do with your giving program, and we’ll provide you with specific information about cost.

To keep up on the latest philanthropy insights, subscribe to our Blog and follow JustGive on LinkedIn

– Candy Culver
Marketing Consultant

Campbell’s – A CSR Leader

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When I say Campbell’s, the first thing that comes to mind is tomato soup—especially since it’s one of the top 10 foods sold off shelves in U.S. grocery stores today. But you may not know what stands behind the familiar products you enjoy: a business that has integrated social responsibility and sustainability into everything it does.

A Bit of History

campbellsThe company was started 146 years ago, in 1869, when Joseph Campbell, a fruit merchant, and Abraham Anderson, an icebox manufacturer, opened their first plant in Camden, New Jersey. Twenty eight years later, Campbell’s created five varieties of condensed soup, including the now-favorite tomato. National distribution of soups followed in 1911.

Campbell’s founders pioneered values the company practices today. It is driven and inspired by its purpose: “real food that matters for life’s moments.” The company believes it has a duty to the people who use its products, the communities that support them, and the earth that provides its ingredients. Those values extend to the Campbell’s family of brands, including Pepperidge Farms, V8, Swanson, Pace, Prego, Plum Organics.

Corporate Social Responsibility Approach

CSR and sustainability for the Campbell Soup Company means:

  • Advancing global wellness and nutrition
  • Helping build a more sustainable environment
  • Honoring its role in society from the farm to the family

v8_products_image03Embracing social responsibility, the company considers its impact across the life cycle of products—the ingredients used, how they’re made and more—and annually reports on CSR performance. (Here’s the latest complete CSR report.)

The company’s formal CSR strategy, started six years ago, is based on four pillars:

Nourishing the planet: Environmental Stewardship

Campbell’s goal is to cut the environmental footprint of its products in half by 2020. Among other actions, this includes reducing greenhouse gas emissions and water use, and eliminating packaging materials. Since 2008, the company has reduced gas emissions by 17.1% and water consumption by 27.4%. And Campbell’s has eliminated more than 89 million pounds of packaging materials since 2009.

Nourishing consumers: Interactions with customers and consumers

For Campbell’s, nourishing consumers means continuing to offer products that promote wellness—with a variety of affordable, convenient and great-tasting foods. In 2014, $2.5 billion of Campbell’s retail sales (about 32%) were foods that satisfied the FDA definition of healthy.

Nourishing employees: Building a high-performance workplace

safetyPhotoCampbell’s is creating a diverse, inclusive and engaging work environment. Its employees, currently 45% women, include the first female CEO and president, Denise Morrison. CSR and sustainability goals are baked into its culture, with company Greatness Awards recognizing employees and teams for results that directly support business strategies and values.

Nourishing neighbors: Community Service

Improving the health of young people in hometown communities is the focus of Campbell’s Healthy Communities program, a $10 million, 10-year initiative. Last year:

  • Employees around the globe contributed more than 15,000 hours of volunteer service to their local communities.
  • During the company’s annual Make a Difference Week, more than 1,100 employees across the United States tackled 90 community projects.

Serving communities is also about philanthropy—giving money, grants and in-kind donations to help them. In 2014, Campbell’s charitable giving totaled more than $70 million, with about $60 million in kind, and another $10 million from corporate donations, cause marketing, nonprofit grants and employee giving.

Campbell’s most recent CSR efforts earned the company the #8 spot on the 2015 list of 100 Best Corporate Citizens compiled by Corporate Responsibility Magazine. That’s a move up from #11 in 2014.

campbellsCampbell’s understands that what they do, every day, matters—and their actions make it clear they take being a good corporate citizen to heart. Borrowing from a popular company marketing campaign, you could say their CSR is M’m, M’m, Good!

Inspired to consider improving your CSR efforts and looking for ways to incorporate philanthropy to make a bigger difference?  Contact us today—we can help.

– Andrea Lloyd
Director of Programs

 

 

Helpful CSR & Sustainability Groups

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Business for Social Responsibility and GlobeScan recently released the 7th annual State of Sustainable Business Report.

The survey revealed what major companies think about sustainability and corporate social responsibility (CSR). It collected data from 440 professionals at multinational companies, in a wide range of industries, with varying levels of commitment to sustainability.

One not-so-surprising trend identified by the survey: sustainability is playing an increasingly important role for almost half of the companies (42%). And while almost 70% say sustainability is at least “fairly well integrated,” the desire is to have it more integrated. Other results:

  • 48% of companies said their key performance indicators include sustainability measures
  • 67% reported sustainability efforts was a top three factor in a company’s reputation

We know, from a 2014 Nielson report, that 55% of global online consumers are willing to pay more for products and services from companies committed to positive social and environmental impact.

Human rights remains the top priority for business, though climate change and access to products meeting basic needs are on the rise. (Detail on pg. 9)

Human rights remains the top priority for business, though climate
change and access to products meeting basic needs are on the rise. (Detail on pg. 9)

And there’s no shortage of research, ratings and rankings related to sustainable business. The current $250 million sustainability information market now includes some 150 rating systems covering more than 50,000 companies.

So how can sustainability and CSR “warriors” find what’s most useful (in practice) and help raise their company’s commitment to something so important?

Social responsibility and sustainability membership associations/organizations are one good way. Here are some of the best in this space:

Business for Social Responsibility (BSR)

bsr-greenbiz-banner_0A global nonprofit organization, BSR works with a network of more than 250 companies to build a just and sustainable world. With offices in Asia, Europe, and North America, BSR develops sustainable business strategies and solutions through consulting, research, and cross-sector collaboration. Members get access to thought leaders in the industry, sustainability solutions and networking opportunities. BSR’s annual conference, being held November 3-5 in San Francisco, will provide the latest social responsibility strategies. Membership information: http://www.bsr.org/en/membership

Committee Encouraging Corporate Philanthropy

CECP LogoCECP’s mission is to create a better world through business. The nonprofit organization is a coalition of CEOs who lead by example and believe improving society is an essential measure of business performance. Founded in 1999 by Paul Newman, CECP consists of more than 150 CEOs of the world’s largest companies across all industries. CECP offers members one-on-one consultation, networking events, exclusive measurement data, and case studies on corporate engagement. Membership is by invitation only. Membership information: http://cecp.co/membership/join-cecp.html

Conscious Capitalism

cclogoA nonprofit organization, Conscious Capitalism is dedicated to helping businesses use their power to serve humanity. It’s a group of companies, nonprofits and other organizations who believe there’s a better way to conduct business, guided by higher purpose, a stakeholder orientation, conscious leadership and conscious culture. Conscious Capitalism offers programs and events, and supports a growing network of chapters, which serve as learning communities. Membership information: http://www.consciouscapitalism.org/membership

Corporate Responsibility Association (CRA)

cra logoCRA promotes the practice and profession of corporate responsibility.  Members can choose to participate in Thought Leadership Councils for specific issues or CEO Responsibility Roundtables. The nonprofit association also provides e-newsletters, CR Magazine, webinars, and an annual conference.  Membership information: http://corporateresponsibilityassociation.org/join-us/

– Andrea Lloyd
Director of Programs

Johnson & Johnson’s Values Guide CSR

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In our household of three boys, Johnson & Johnson is a familiar brand. But what I didn’t know about the company—which may be best known for Band-Aids®, baby powder and Tylenol®—was that it practiced corporate social responsibility long before the term existed.

Caring for the world, one person at a time inspires and unites the people of Johnson & Johnson. In 1943, the company adopted its credo of values that guides decision making and challenges everyone at the company to put the needs and well-being of the people they serve first.

JnJ-Our-Credo-700Crafted more than 62 years ago by Robert Wood Johnson, the son of the founder, the credo is more than a moral compass . . . it’s “a visionary statement of corporate purpose” and the reason Johnson & Johnson has become the largest and most diversified health care company in the world.

In the past two years, Johnson & Johnson’s commitment to social responsibility has placed it among the top three of the 100 Best Corporate Citizens (a list compiled by Corporate Responsibility Magazine). And just this week, CEO Alex Gorsky received The Appeal of Conscience Award as a corporate ­­leader who by “deed and action has advanced human dignity and social justice.”

One simple but powerful idea in the company credo states, “We are responsible to the communities in which employees live and work, and to the world community as well. We must be good citizens—support good works and charities….”

Tradition of Philanthropy

Johnson & Johnson’s record of giving goes back to the early 1900s. Within hours of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, the company gave the largest amount of help received from any organization, establishing its tradition of disaster giving and community philanthropy.

Tout-Full-Our-Giving_0Making the world a healthier place is at the heart of company philanthropy, focused in three strategic areas:

  • Saving and improving the lives of women and children
  • Preventing disease in vulnerable populations
  • Strengthening the healthcare workforce

Their approach? Work with partners to deliver community-based solutions.

One example of a successful partnership is Safe Kids Worldwide. For more than 27 years, Johnson & Johnson has been a part of the global organization dedicated to protecting kids from unintentional injuries. Safe-Kids-1000x666Through a network of more than 500 U.S. coalitions and partnerships with organizations in 25 countries, Safe Kids reduces injuries and deaths from motor vehicles, sports, drowning, falls, burns, poisonings and other activities. By 2008, this campaign had helped reduce the death rate for U.S. children aged 14 and younger by 45%.

In 2014, Johnson & Johnson’s philanthropy totaled nearly $172 million for organizations around the world, including $14.5 million through its Matching Gifts program (the company double-matched employee contributions last year).

It’s important for the company to evaluate the results of philanthropy, so they’ve set a sustainability goal to increase the number of programs measuring health-related outcomes. 2015 progress: 90 percent of Johnson & Johnson’s 230 philanthropy programs now monitor and report health-related outcomes.

Citizenship & Sustainability Efforts

Theirs is a long and involved history of citizenship and sustainability that this blog can’t really capture. But whether researching and developing new treatments for disease or working to reduce its environmental footprint, Johnson & Johnson conducts business in a responsible way. Most recent efforts include:

OurGiving-Pillar3-thumbnailAdvancing Human Health and Well-Being. In 2014, in response to the Ebola crisis, the company collaborated with the global health community to accelerate and expand production of the Ebola vaccine—to get it to families and health care professionals as quickly as possible.


Leading a Dynamic & Growing Business Responsibly
. 2015 is the first time Johnson & Johnson has established social goals as part of the company’s overall strategy. Energy-Use-Reduction-Efforts-300x200Its Healthy Future 2015 sustainability goals range from environmental sustainability and enhanced supply chain stewardship to greater transparency and commitments to address diseases in the developing world.

We’re not all leading global companies like Johnson & Johnson with a 129-year business history and enough resources to tackle world problems. But every business can examine its values and consider how to make a difference with philanthropy.  Inspired to get started? Contact us today—we can help.

– Andrea Lloyd
Director of Programs

IMAGE SOURCE: All images via http://www.jnj.com

Can JustGive Help Our Company Distribute Donations to Charity?

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Featured FAQ
Can JustGive help our company distribute donations to charity?

Here at JustGive, we offer services to help companies of any size incorporate philanthropy into their business. Many of our clients already have systems in place to collect charitable donations from their employees or customers, but need a qualified partner to take care of distributing those funds to the recipient charities. That’s where JustGive can step in.

Question
Can JustGive help our company distribute donations to charity?

Answer
donation_flickr_opensourceYes, JustGive offers donation processing support for a variety of situations. As a donor advised fund (DAF), we are authorized to manage charitable donations on behalf of companies, organizations, families, or individuals (eliminating your compliance headaches).

The process can be as simple as sending us a spreadsheet periodically with the donation detail (recipient charity, donation amount, donor info if available, etc.). We use that data to verify charities and securely distribute the donations, then bill you for the total donation amount and processing service.

Click here to learn more about our donation processing services and discover how JustGive’s clients have made an impact using our services. And don’t hesitate to contact us to see how we can help your company.

For more FAQs about corporate giving, visit our Support Center.

– Sarah Bacon
Director of Product

P.S. To keep up on philanthropy news and insights: Subscribe to our blog, and follow us on LinkedIn.

CSR Pioneers Ben & Jerry’s

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Ben & Jerry’s is thought of as the ice cream company with heart and soul. From the start, its founders Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield set out to prove that business can play a positive role in society.

In 1978, after taking a $5 correspondence course in ice cream-making from Penn State and making a $12,000 investment ($4,000 borrowed), Ben and Jerry began selling ice cream from a renovated gas station in Burlington, Vermont.  While the company name references only two men, a third man, Jeff Furman (a lawyer and accountant) is considered the ampersand in Ben & Jerry’s and a driving force in the company’s social responsibility efforts.

Utne Reader described them as three men who shared ideals formed in the 1960s and tempered by Vietnam and Watergate. They were smart and creative but suspicious of big business, painfully aware of injustice, and looking for better ways to live.

Social mission as a guiding business principle

In 1988, Ben & Jerry’s became one of the first companies in the world to make a social mission integral to its business and inseparable from its product and economic goals. Its social mission: use the company in innovative ways to make the world a better place.

When Unilever bought Ben & Jerry’s in 2000, the company became a wholly-owned subsidiary but fought to retain its social consciousness. Through a unique merger agreement, Ben & Jerry’s established an independent board of directors so it could maintain the company’s mission and preserve its values—a board that has the right to challenge Unilever at any time if it feels those values are compromised.

In September 2012, Ben & Jerry’s was certified as a B corp and became the first and only wholly-owned subsidiary of a public company to do so. Its publicly-available impact assessment shows how the company is doing in its governance and for the environment, workers, and community. (The B Corp model can ensure companies provide benefits to society in a way that’s transparent, balanced, and people can believe in.)

“We wanted to constantly challenge ourselves to be better,” said Rob Michalak, Ben & Jerry’s Director of Social Mission. “This model provides the rigor and standards to ensure that we are living up to our own mission and that we push further.”

The measures of success

Creating linked prosperity for suppliers, employees, farmers, franchisees, customers, and neighbors—everyone connected to Ben & Jerry’s—is how the company defines success. They operate to benefit people and communities, support social and environmental justice, and give back.

Sourcing & purchasing ingredients. The company uses its purchasing power to buy Fair Trade Certified base ingredients of sugar, cocoa, banana, coffee and vanilla.

In manufacturing, Ben & Jerry’s works to reduce its footprint and has offset 22,400 tons of CO2 emissions since 2002. The company is also actively involved in climate justice, mandatory GMO labeling, peace building and many more issues.

Ben & Jerry’s: Giving back

Their efforts to give back go beyond improving quality of life for local communities. In addition to donating more than 5% of profits to charity:

  • Ben & Jerry’s foundation engages its employees in philanthropy and social change work, and supports grassroots activism and community organizing for social and environmental justice around the country. In 1991, the foundation was restructured to be employee-led, and employees make all the decisions about grants. In 2014, the foundation won the National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy’s award for a Corporate Grantmaker.
  • The foundation funds the Vermont Community Action Team (CAT) grant program for an array of programs, and prioritizes support for basic human needs and the underserved, including seniors, at-risk youth and low income communities. In addition to grants, employees work together on several large-scale community service projects each year.
  • PartnerShops are independently-owned Ben & Jerry’s scoop shops operated by community-based nonprofit organizations, and run as social enterprises. They offer job and entrepreneurial training to youth and young adults who may face barriers to employment.

Ben & Jerry’s has set a high CSR bar. Not every business has the resources and ability to pursue social responsibility with such fervor, but any business can get started.  Inspired to discover how? Contact JustGive today; we’ll help.

– Candy Culver
Marketing Consultant

What Programs and Products does JustGive Offer for Companies?

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FEATURED FAQ:
JustGive’s Corporate Services

For company giving programs, United Way may pop to mind first. But there are many options and flexible partners, like JustGive, with the experience and expertise to help your business make an impact with philanthropy.

people_jumping_29365278.jpgWhether you’re a large corporation or small business, JustGive offers a variety of products to incorporate charitable giving into your business . . .  and, at the same time, engage employees and customers. Making things better for your company, your community, and the world.

Here’s a short description of what JustGive can do for your company.

Question
What programs and products does JustGive offer for companies?

Answer
JustGive can help your company launch a donation campaign or giving day for a specific charity or cause, or a long-term charitable giving program that encourages philanthropy year round (including matching gifts).

We can also provide donation support and processing if you have an existing giving program or if you’re a new company with a social impact purpose. JustGive takes care of compliance and efficiently distributes donations to charity for you.

woman_casual_business_25401351.jpgJustGive’s charity gift cards are a great way for your company to give employees and customers something extra: the chance to make a difference for a cause they care about. They’re flexible, and ideal as holiday or thank you gifts, traffic-generating tradeshow giveaways, rewards and incentives, or distinctive sales meeting swag. Your recipients can redeem the charity gift cards to donate to any charity they choose (from nearly 2 million in our database).

Get more detail about all our Corporate Services on our site and read our Success Stories to discover how other companies have effectively used JustGive’s charitable giving products.

Don’t miss the latest CSR and philanthropy news and insights: Subscribe to our blog, and follow us on LinkedIn.

-Sarah Bacon
Director of Product