Help Nepal Earthquake Victims

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UPDATE: 
Another 7.3 earthquake has rocked Nepal, striking close to Mt. Everest. This powerful tremor triggered landslides and toppled buildings, and was followed by at least five aftershocks that killed dozens and injuring more than 1,000. Already shell-shocked people are struggling and traumatized—and will likely be sleeping outside to stay safe. They need your help.


Help Nepal Earthquake Victims

A 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck Nepal Saturday morning, April 25, near the capital of Kathmandu. The quake is the largest to hit the poor South Asian country in more than 80 years. As casualty numbers rise, it has killed over 5,000 people in Nepal, Tibet, Bangladesh and at the Nepal-China border—and injured nearly 6,000.  The quake also triggered a huge avalanche that killed at least 18 climbers in the Mount Everest area. Entire villages are destroyed.

Powerful aftershocks continue to jolt residents, many who are sleeping outside and in new tent villages. CNN producer Ingrid Formanek who arrived Sunday night, said Kathmandu “looks like a city where buildings have been abandoned. People are hanging out in public squares and at intersections to avoid rubble from buildings.” The earthquake and aftershocks have turned one of the world’s most scenic areas into a scene of massive destruction.

Rescue, relief and recovery efforts are underway, and families and children urgently need your help. Here are 12 charities providing life-saving emergency services, including vital shelter, food, water, sanitation supplies, and medical care:

button_donate_nowThe American Red Cross is working with the Nepal Red Cross and the global Red Cross network to coordinate support.

button_donate_nowAmeriCares has sent it response team and shipments of medical aid and relief supplies for survivors.

button_donate_nowCARE has worked in Nepal since 1978, and is providing life-saving food, water, shelter and health care.

button_donate_nowCatholic Relief Services is sending relief materials such as shelter kits, water, sanitation and hygiene supplies.

button_donate_nowDoctors without Borders has mobilized eight teams from nearby countries to help, including surgical teams and non-medical staff – along with emergency supplies.

button_donate_nowHumane Society International stands ready to support local agencies or animal welfare groups and help with animal-related needs in the strike zone.

button_donate_nowMercy Corps’ team is on the ground, focused on delivering rapid, lifesaving aid to hard-hit communities.

button_donate_nowOperation USA and its partners in the country are helping distribute essential supplies for victims and hospitals.

button_donate_nowOxfam International has a team in the country and is responding with clean water, sanitation materials and emergency food.

button_donate_nowSave the Children is protecting vulnerable children and providing relief to families with emergency kits, hygiene materials and tarps.

button_donate_nowShelterBox is distributing aid, including tents they have prepositioned in the country that can serve as emergency clinics.

button_donate_nowWorld Vision is providing first aid kits, sleeping mats, blankets and jerry cans; temporary shelter; and protection for children.

Disaster Giving: American Express

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Image Source: Toshifumi Kitamura/AFP/Getty Images

When natural disasters strike, generous people around the world open their wallets to give to organizations helping victims. Here at JustGive, we are lucky to partner with companies like American Express® who enable their cardholders to quickly provideAmerican Express Logo support.

After the devastating 2010 earthquake in Haiti, the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan, and the 2013 Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines, American Express reached out to JustGive to find a fast, easy solution for their cardmembers who wanted to help.

Timely Disaster Campaigns

Within 24 hours of each disaster, JustGive launched online fundraisers so American Express cardholders could donate to charities directly providing victims with emergency services, shelter, healthcare and food.

Cardholders simply visited the American Express MembersGive website to donate using their American Express credit card or their Membership Reward points.

JustGive helped American Express identify and vet the key charities aiding victims for each disaster, whether they were U.S.-based organizations offering aid (like the American Red Cross), or other charities local to the region where the disaster took place.

American Express supported its cardholders’ generosity by covering all credit card processing fees. That meant that 100% of each donation made it to the charities making a difference.

Image Source: Flickr

Image Source: Flickr

The result? Hundreds of thousands of dollars from American Express cardholders were donated to organizations helping disaster victims recover and rebuild.

In its one year post-report for the 2011 Japan earthquake and tsunami, the American Red Cross recognized American Express as a member of its Disaster Responder Program for contributing at least $250,000 annually.

In the last decade American Express has provided assistance for more than 50 disasters in 35 countries, through such leading disaster relief agencies as the American Red Cross and International Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, Doctors Without Borders, International Rescue Committee, Save the Children, and the United Nations World Food Program.

We’re proud to make it possible for American Express and its cardholders to respond quickly and effectively to tragic disasters around the world. It’s one way JustGive helps companies make an impact with charitable giving programs for their customers or employees.

– Sarah Bacon

Director of Product

 

 

YEAR IN REVIEW: A LOOK BACK AT 2014

Image Source: Flickr

Image Source: Flickr

Thanks to your giving and support, JustGive expanded philanthropy and sent more than $30 million to charity in 2014!

We passed a major milestone in May, processing our 1 millionth donation, and are proud that 24 percent of giving came from 2013 donors returning to use the site. We also saw charity gift card purchases grow by 9 percent. To be more accessible and expand our services, we launched our mobile responsive site and added the ability for companies to independently buy a quantity of gift cards.

Here’s a glimpse of our impact—and what we accomplished together—this year.

We’re charging into 2015 eager to do more good, fulfilling our mission to make charitable giving a part of everyday life. Here’s to making more of a difference!

Help us kick off the year in the best way possible: Set up an automatic monthly donation to your favorite charities today.

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Thank you for giving.

—Andrea Lloyd, Director of Programs

THE MANY FACES OF HOMELESSNESS: HOW YOU CAN HELP

blog_title_image_homelessnessKnowing how to help a homeless person can sometimes feel difficult, confusing and overwhelming. The dollar you give might be used to buy drugs or alcohol. Even offering food can be a problem – imagine handing an apple to a homeless man and then discovering he has no teeth. Just as there are many reasons people become homeless, there are also many ways to help. Understanding the leading causes of homelessness is often the best way to learn what the homeless need and how you can make a positive difference in their lives. The chronically homeless, who often struggle with mental health or substance abuse issues, need a safe and stable living environment where they can get counseling and health care. To help them, consider volunteering at a local shelter or halfway house that provides longer-term housing. Donating clean towels, pillows and blankets can also help create a comfortable and safe living environment. The majority of homeless youth bw_homeless_teens_21461332have been kicked out of their homes or abandoned by parents or guardians. Others who left on their own accord have suffered physical and emotional abuse at the hands of their families. For many, trusting another adult or authority figure can be difficult. One of the best ways to help is to simply ask them what they need. Maybe it’s a hot meal, a warm coat or a clean pair of socks; or maybe it’s information on how to get into foster care, enroll in a drug and alcohol detox program or register for the GED. Taking the time to listen to their needs, and to follow through, can go a long way in helping them regain their trust in others and get off the streets. imm needs housing homelessFor many veterans, physical disability, mental anguish and post-traumatic stress can make readjusting to civilian life very difficult. This can lead to drug and alcohol addiction, the inability to hold down a steady job and homelessness. Because many veterans have very specific needs to help them get back on their feet—job placement services, medical services, housing assistance, counseling—there are numerous ways to get involved. Consider donating your time or money to organizations which help homeless vets:

While we need to address the problem of homelessness as a whole, the more we can understand each person’s individual circumstances, the more we can help. Before making assumptions or judgments, take the time to ask some questions and do a little research. It can make all the difference. The Face(s) of Homelessness

  • Number of homeless in the United States: 610,042
  • Number of chronic homeless: 109,132 (18%)
  • Number of homeless youth under 18: 380,000
  • Number of homeless veterans: 57,849 (9%)

For more charities helping the homeless with shelter, counseling services and job training.

-Amelia Glynn, Marketing Contractor

Hunger and Food Justice: Community Building for Food Equality

Hunger: it’s a daunting problem the world over. Even though I was eager to research and write on this topic, when I started to dig into it, I got more and more overwhelmed with how broad and profound the issue … Continue reading

Help Save Animals—Channel Your Care and Passion into Action.

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We have a 2-year old goldendoodle affectionately known as “Sir Riley Flannigan.” Flannigan for his apricot color, Riley’s a mix of poodle and golden retriever that’s taken a place in my life and heart I could never have imagined.

My family had outside cats and dogs when I was growing up on the farm, but until Riley (who doesn’t shed), my allergies kept me from owning an animal as an adult. Now, sharing every day with such a loving, sensitive, energetic, and smart dog that has comforted me through sadness and sickness– I can’t imagine what kind of person could harm or hurt any companion animal.

We know animals love and remember us, and feel pain and fear. Their eyes and expressions tell us what they can’t say. They’re companions who watch over and protect us. Dogs, in particular, give many humans a new “leash” on life—they guide the blind and visually impaired, improve the lives of autistic children, save diabetics, and give independence to people with disabilities and veterans.

There’s no question our pets miss us when we’re gone—watch Bugaboo show and tell his owner, Lieutenant Gary Daughtery, how happy he is to see him after six months overseas:

http://on.aol.com/video/soldier-comes-home-to-warm-welcome-from-dog-517865377

 

Honestly, the many types of animal abuse and cruelty—what we know, see, read and hear about—can be overwhelming. I sometimes turn away from TV ads and scroll quickly past Facebook posts because they get to me. And I feel pretty helpless to stop all the abuse. There are a lot of issues to tackle.

How do we move past anger and overwhelm about how animals are treated to help save them? We can start with what we see every day and be their voice—using our passion to take action.

Learn and Recognize Signs of Pet Abuse

Pay attention to the animals around you. Are there any dogs you’ve seen chained up for hours on end? Have you ever walked your dog and witnessed another aggressive, out of control one? Or gone by a house where there are so many animals you worry about their care? These could be signs of neglect or violence.

  • Neglect is denying an animal adequate food, water, shelter (a dog house), medical care (injuries left untreaDogted), clean area, socialization (is the animal aggressive or timid when approached by owner), or chained up in a yard.
  • Violence is deliberately torturing, beating, or mutilating an animal.

Speak Up: Report Abuse

Almost all acts of animal violence or neglect are punishable by law. While animal cruelty laws vary from state to state, 49 states have laws that contain felony provisions. (South Dakota is the only one that doesn’t). Be prepared: Search online at Pets911 or PetFinder’s database to find a local animal control department, animal shelter or humane society in your area—and program the number into your cell phone.

If you suspect abuse or neglect of any animal, report it to your local police department or area animal control agency. If you’re traveling, call the local police department (911).

If you know of dog or cock fighting, call The Humane Society hotline at 1-877-TIP-HSUS and report it.

Donate—Support Organizations Working to Stop the Abuse

According to the ASPCA, every 60 seconds an animal is abused. Put your money where your heart is, and give for the education, protection, and care Stray Kittenof animals. (Consider an ongoing monthly gift.) If you don’t know where to start:

While animal issues may seem staggering and even depressing, you and I can take action to make life better for them—to end suffering and save these amazing creatures, one by one.  And the next time I sit with Riley or get a doggie kiss, I’ll feel good knowing I’m doing something to help precious creatures like him.

-Candy Culver

Marketing Consultant

 

Help Colorado Flood Victims Recover

Starting on September 9, the state of Colorado received a huge amount of rain, causing intense flooding and massive amounts of damage. Flood waters cover almost 200 miles from North to South and affect 17 counties. A state of emergency was declared, authorizing federal search and rescue teams, and supplies be sent to the area. The devastation, though, is far-reaching:

  • Nearly 19,000 homes were damaged, and more than 15,000 were destroyed.
  • 1,750 people and 300 pets were rescued by air and ground. Six people were killed.
  • 5,250 gallons of crude oil spilled into the South Platte River when storage tanks in Milliken were damaged.
  • 200 miles of state highways and 50 bridges were destroyed.

Quick repairs are absolutely critical, since winter weather will make highway work far more difficult. Please donate now to organizations helping Colorado recover:

    • American Red Crosssupplying food, shelter, and relief items such as clean up kits, rakes, tarps, shovels, flashlights, gloves, coolers, comfort kits, and insect repellant.
    • Foothills United Way – established the ‘Foothills Flood Relief Fund’ to provide needed health and human services to those affected by the flooding in Boulder and Broomfield counties.
    • Salvation Army – deploying mobile canteens, and is providing hundreds of thousands of meals to displaced people.
    • Save the Children – working with American Red Cross to create “Child-Friendly Spaces” in evacuation centers to ease the trauma on children.
    • Weld County Humane Society – providing assistance to the more than 300 displaced pets rescued by air and ground.

Moore Oklahoma Tornado: Help them recover

On May 20, a massive tornado destroyed parts of Oklahoma City and Moore, Oklahoma, killing 24 people—including seven children. With your help, organizations like the Red Cross and Food Bank of Oklahoma provided immediate disaster relief to people affected.

As relief efforts continue, the recovery process begins. After a week, victims of the tornado are coming to grips with the loss of their homes, along with all their personal belongings. The twister caused up to $5 billion in insured damage, and 1,200 homes were completely destroyed.

While it could be easy to let this disaster fade in our minds as media coverage wanes, rebuilding will take quite awhile. This tornado flattened entire blocks of homes, two schools and a hospital. Imagine losing everything you own in a few short minutes—that’s exactly the reality many people face.

Help the children, families and the community of Moore, Oklahoma rebuild ”normal” life, and donate now to charities working for their recovery. As more information becomes available, we’ll continue to update this list:

  • Adopt a Classroom – helping teachers and students at Plaza Towers and Briarwood Elementary Schools rebuild their classrooms.
  • AmeriCares  assessing and addressing long term health needs.
  • Architecture for Humanity – working with local and regional construction professionals to support the rebuilding.
  • Habitat for Humanity – seeking help with long-term rebuilding efforts and aid for families who need safe, affordable places to live.
  • Matthew: 25 Ministries – continuing to support the families and people of Moore as long as it’s needed.
  • Operation Blessing International – working with The Home Depot to dispatch a construction unit, mobile command center, trucks with tools and supplies, and a team of construction foremen to Moore.
  • Operation USA – making small grants (as funds allow) to community-based organizations as they rebuild.
  • Samaritan’s Purse – focusing on cleaning and repairing damaged homes.
  • Save the Children – providing recovery support for children and families.
  • Team Rubicon – assisting with home repair and rebuilding.

This local tragedy stirs deep emotion

I’ve been having great difficulty dealing with the horror that took place at Sandy Hook Elementary School. My kids are often in Sandy Hook for sports and other activities, and I have spent many weekends on the sidelines of the soccer fields directly behind the school.

Holiday AngelNewtown is almost identical to my town of Weston, Connecticut, so it is very hard for me to let go of the horror by rationalizing to myself that it is far away or such a different type of community than my own. This trauma is deeper for all of us because the reality is that this could have happened anywhere and to any of us. That is what is most profoundly frightening about this event.

I have a 7 year old who is always curious, and he came home from school on Friday asking a lot of questions. After asking all the main questions, he paused and asked, “How did the kids know what to do when their teacher died?” He was obviously putting himself directly into that situation. I am very sad he has to think about these things at such an early age. As he was going to bed that night he asked, “Does God make these bad people?” I had to explain that everyday, we all wake up and have to make many decisions that can make us “good” or “bad” for that moment.

Every night now when I put him to bed, I first get a chill of realization that he could have been in that 1st grade classroom, and then I give a grateful hug that he is still here to tuck in.

It is almost impossible to comprehend the depth of tragedy and anguish that will always be a part of the Newtown community. Life is so precious—and at the same time, it can be unfair and unpredictable.

While our hearts are broken for the victims and all of those affected by this senseless tragedy,  the healing process must begin. There are many nonprofits that are currently supporting the town with: cleaning up the old school, setting up the new school, providing health services to residents in the community, supporting the firefighters, supplying aid for the memorial services, and offering ongoing activities to help the kids heal. To find out more and how to help Newtown, here’s an article that gives several ways you can be supportive.

A few charities providing the community with services that you can donate to:

kindnessMy personal belief is that we all must put a little bit of goodness back into the world and do what we can to overcome the horror by being kind to those around us. In addition to helping Newtown directly, random acts of kindness should be part of our daily routine to spread goodness. More than something we do in response to Ann Curry’s tweet…something we make part of our everyday life.

—Kendall Webb, Executive Director

How You Can Help Flood Victims in Pakistan

Flooding in the district of Muzzafargarh

Photo Credit: Save the Children A family at a makeshift camp for persons displaced by the extensive flooding in Gujrat Town, district of Muzzafargarh...Intense flooding forced Akram and his extended family of 13 to leave their home on August 2nd. ..Those fleeing the flooding reported an estimated 200 houses washed away or destroyed by flooding. Most inhabitants of Gujrat earn a living through agriculture, farming Rice, Sugar and Cotton. No deaths were reported by the villagers however they estimate that 90% of the herd of cattle and goats have been lost to flooding. ..Within the makeshift camp children are suffering with diarrhea and skin complaints. There is no shelter, no sanitation, no access to clean water and no electricity. Most of the internally displaced people (IDP) sleep under the trees for shelter from the rain. They complain that they have received very little food and water, and only one one occasion had any access of medical supplies via a private donor...

With more than 5 million homeless and 1,600 people feared dead to date, the floods in Pakistan are becoming one of the worst in recorded history. One-fifth of the country is under water. The World Health Organization says that 46 of Pakistan’s 135 districts are affected by the flooding (an area close to the size of Italy). With the lack of clean water, urgent danger, and the specter of communicable diseases such as cholera threatening hundreds of thousands, help is urgently needed.

Nonprofits are hard at work to make a difference in Pakistan. Here’s how you can help:

  • Learn more about how charities are helping on the ground by following their blogs, photo blogs  or Facebook updates.
  • Donate now to help those nonprofits continue their relief work.

Nonprofit Response

  • Acumen Fund: The Acumen Fund supports innovative organizations working in Pakistan. They are an excellent resource to locate strong groups providing flood victims with much needed services.

Blog: http://blog.acumenfund.org/2010/08/13/the-pakistan-floods-how-you-can-help/

  • American Red Cross: The Pakistan Red Crescent has provided thousands of people with food packs, relief items and tents from its prepositioned supplies. The American Red Cross has committed an initial $100,000 to support their ongoing relief efforts for the most vulnerable populations, including women and children.

Blog: http://www.redcross.org/portal/site/en/menuitem.1a019a978f421296e81ec89e43181aa0/?vgnextoid=c02a25d459d3a210VgnVCM10000089f0870aRCRD

  • CARE: CARE is supporting health teams, mobile clinics and the distribution of emergency supplies.

Blog: http://www.care-international.org/Featured-Articles/pakistan-read-the-blogs.html

  • Concern Worldwide US: So far, 5,700 families have been helped by Concern Worldwide’s emergency response in Pakistan.

Blog: http://www.concern.net/blogs/pakistan-floods-coverage

  • Doctors Without Borders: In addition to the scale-up of medical activities, teams continue to focus on providing affected families with basic items and safe drinking water in order to improve their living conditions and prevent the spread of diseases.

Blog: http://www.msf.org/msfinternational/countries/asia/pakistan/index.cfm

http://www.msf.org/msfinternational/invoke.cfm?objectid=84590B0A-15C5-F00A-25D2E0901B0886CD&component=toolkit.article&method=full_html

Plog: http://msf.ca/blogs/photos/2010/08/09/pakistan-7/

Blog: http://www.theirc.org/blog/where/pakistan

  • Islamic Relief USA: Islamic Relief USA launched a $2 million campaign to help the victims, and more than 500 Islamic Relief staff are on the ground distributing aid, conducting needs assessments and helping in the general relief effort.

Blog: http://blog.islamicreliefusa.org/

  • Operation USA: Through a network of local partner agencies, Operation USA is responding with critical medical aid, water purification tablets and shelter. Visit the website or Facebook for updates on their efforts in Pakistan.

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Operation-USA/103370036602?ref=ts

  • Oxfam USA: Oxfam and its partners launched a rapid-relief effort to reach more than one million people with essential aid.

Blog: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-south-asia-10898817

  • Save The Children: With programs in Pakistan for 30 years and the capacity to mount large-scale relief, Save the Children quickly deployed staff and launched a humanitarian response. They’ve provided assistance to more than 37,800 children and adults.

Blog: http://www.savethechildren.org.uk/blogs/category/theme/pakistan-floods/

Plog: View a slideshow of images on MSN

  • US Fund for UNICEF: UNICEF teams have been delivering safe drinking water, critical medical supplies, supplementary food and family hygiene kits to more than a million people a day. In addition, UNICEF is supporting mobile medical teams, vaccination campaigns and sanitation efforts across the affected zone.

Blog: http://www.unicefusa.org/news/news-from-the-field/unicef-emergency-aid-arrives-pakistan.html

  • World Vision International: World Vision is providing emergency health services, distributing water, emergency food items, and supplies. They plan to reach 150,000 people over the next three months.

Blog: http://www.worldvision.org/content.nsf/about/emergency-presskit-pakistan?Open&lpos=lft_txt_Pakistan-Floods

Visit us on Facebook and share with your friends and family to help raise awareness and support so Pakistan families and children can recover.